Can Cockatoos Count By Twos?

Songs for Learning Through Music and Movement

Introduction
Rhythm, melody and active involvement mean learning with a smile. This recording
for students in grades K through 3 uses an enjoyable combination of music and
movement to:
• Enhance listening and comprehension skills
• Teach basic academic concepts
• Increase vocabulary and stimulate language proficiency
• Develop fitness and basic motor skills
• Foster the recognition of rhythm and melody
• Encourage problem solving and creativity

The activities facilitate comprehension by involving the whole child; thinking, moving, and relating to others. Subjects include:
• Numbers and number order
• Addition and subtraction
• Phonics
• Rhyming and spelling patterns
• Primary and secondary colors
• Time on the clock
• Months and seasons
• Comparison of opposites
• Identification of body parts
• Space and direction
• Appreciation of diversity
• Differentiation of fantasy and reality
• Creative expression
• Past, present and future

This teaching guide contains the following information for each song:

Objectives: Help teachers and parents include the songs where they relate to classroom curriculum or daily activities.
Activity: Suggests how teachers and parents can introduce and explain activities before the children participate with the recording.
Setting: Identifies space requirements and arrangement of children.
Materials: Are listed when specific props such as number cards or color cards are required.
Lyrics: Enable teachers and parents to introduce vocabulary and ideas that may be new to children. The words to a song may also be enlarged or printed on a large poster board to help children read and sing along with the recording.
Variation: Shows other ways of actively participating with the recording.
Follow Up: Suggests things to do after playing the recording. There are endless ways to use these songs. Feel free to vary and adapt the ideas suggested in this guide and to create new ways of using the songs to fit your school or home situation. The ultimate goal is always the same: to foster enthusiasm and enjoyment of learning through music and movement.

Click Title for Lyrics:
1. Can Cockatoos Count By Twos?
2. Rhyme Time Band
3. Colors In Motion (Basic)
4. Magic Scarf
5. Jolly Clock (Time on the hour)
6. Months On The Move
7. We Are All Alike
8. Colors In Motion (Mixing Colors)
9. What's Bigger Than A Bear?


10. Seasons
11. Jumping To Add And Subtract
12. Numbers Can Tell About You
13. Jolly Clock (Advanced)
14. Betty Beep
15. Toss It High Let It Fly
16. Rhyme Time Band II
17. Thirty Second Challenge
18. It's Time To Go

1. Can Cockatoos Count By Twos?
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Distinguish between fact and fantasy
• Recognize rhyming words
• Count by twos and tens to discover number patterns
• Count backwards from ten to zero.

Setting:
Sit in chairs or on the rug.

Activity:
This song is a series of questions. Listen to each question and sing it back like an echo. Answer each question by saying, "Yes" three times or "No" three times. End each verse by counting: first verse count by twos, second verse count by tens, third verse count backwards from ten to zero.

Lyric:
Can a tree chase a flea?
Can a pig dance a jig?
Can a car travel far?
Can cockatoos count by twos?
two, four, six, eight, ten, twelve,
fourteen, sixteen, eighteen, twenty

Can a cat catch a rat?
Can a mouse lift a house?
Can a child run wild?
Can little red hens count by ten's?
ten, twenty, thirty, forty, fifty, sixty,
seventy, eighty, ninety, one hundred

Can a fish wash a dish?
Can a wall crack and fall?
Can a snail read the mail?
Can a rocket ship hop and skip?
ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five,
four, three, two, one, zero

Variation:
Show in movement how it would look if a mouse lifted a house or a tree chased a flea. As you listen to the song, create motions to act out the real and imaginary situations described in each question.

Follow Up:
Identify the rhyming words in each question. Can you think of other words that rhyme and make up your own questions about real and imaginary situations?

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2. Rhyme Time Band
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Recognize word ending families
• Focus on patterns of constructing words (onsets and rimes)
• Identify parts of the body
• Explore a variety of ways we can move.

Setting:
Participants can do this activity sitting or standing. They can be in a fixed seat situation, or spread out in an open area.

Activity:
In each verse you will hear three words that rhyme. Move a part of your body that also rhymes with these words. You need not wait to hear all three words. Move as soon as you know the answer.

Lyric:
Shake a part of your body that rhymes with sand,
Rhymes with grand, rhymes with land
...Everybody shake your hand

Jiggle a part that rhymes with peg
Rhymes with egg, rhymes with beg
...Everybody jiggle your leg

Circle a part that rhymes with boulder
Rhymes with colder, rhymes with older
...Everybody circle your shoulder

Wink a part that rhymes with buy
Rhymes with tie, rhymes with cry
...Everybody wink your eye

Chorus:
We're the Rhyme Time Band
The prime time sound in all the land
We're the Rhyme Time Band
Come on and join the fun!

Swing a part of your body that rhymes with farm,
Rhymes with charm, rhymes with harm
...Everybody swing your arm

Bend a part that rhymes with tree
Rhymes with bee, rhymes with flea
...Everybody bend your knee

Twiddle a part that rhymes with numb
Rhymes with crumb, rhymes with drum
...Everybody twiddle your thumb

Twist a part that rhymes with line
Rhymes with nine, rhymes with fine
...Everybody twist your spine

Repeat Chorus

Follow Up:
Name a part of your body you did not move with this song. Can you think of words that rhyme with this body part? Sing this song again using your own ideas. You can also explore different ways of moving, and discover other body parts and rhyming words with the song "Rhyme Time Band II" (#16).

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3. Colors In Motion (Basic)
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Identify colors: red, blue, yellow, green, purple and orange
• Create movements with color scarves, crepe paper or ribbons
• Develop listening skills.

Materials:
Colored scarves, crepe paper or ribbons; red, blue, yellow, green, purple and orange.

Setting:
Participants begin seated in chairs or seated on the floor in an open area with space to move freely.

Activity:
Start in a seated position. When your color is called, stand and create motions with your scarf or ribbon. By the end of each verse, all the colors are moving. Continue moving until you hear the words, "Everybody quickly jump up and sit down."

Lyric:
Red stand up Green stand up
Purple stand up Orange stand up
Blue stand up Yellow stand up
Hey everybody let's wiggle and wave
And see all the colors in motion

This is a song about colors, you see them all around
There is red on a stop sign, green on a tree
Blue in the sky and sea
Now everybody quickly jump up and sit down

Yellow stand up Blue stand up
Orange stand up Purple stand up
Green stand up Red stand up
Hey everybody let's turn in a circle
And see all the colors in motion

This is a song about colors,
you see them all around
There is orange on a pumpkin, purple on a plum
Yellow on bananas yum, yum

This is a song about colors,
you see them all around
It's about the happiest song in town
Now everybody quickly jump up and sit down

Follow Up:
This activity can be used as a lead up to the song "Colors In Motion" (Mixing colors)
(# 8). If you are using scarves, you can explore other ways of moving with your scarf with the next song, "Magic Scarf" (#4) and the song "Toss It High Let It Fly" (#15).

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4. Magic Scarf
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Provide opportunities for problem solving and creative expression
• Enhance imaginative powers
• Increase vocabulary

Setting:
Participants spread out in an open area with room to move freely.

Materials:
A scarf for each participant.

Activity:
You can pretend your scarf is many different things. In this song you can imagine your scarf is a pom pom, a cloud, the tail of a pony, a ghost, a hula skirt, an ocean, and a cape that gives you the power to fly. Create ways of moving that go with the imagery of the words and the mood of the music you hear.

Lyric:
Let's see how many things a scarf can be
The many, many things a scarf can be
Make believe puts magic in a piece of fabric
The power of pretending is the key

Your scarf is a pom pom shaking in the air
Up, down, here, there, shake it everywhere

Your scarf is a cloud floating in the sky
Casting shadows as it slowly passes by

Pretend you are a pony; your scarf becomes a tail
It bounces in the wind as you gallop down the trail
Yippee yi-yi-yo, off we go!

Your scarf is a ghost, haunting you everywhere
Hovering in the air, tickling your face and hair
Swooping and swirling, tumbling and twirling
A spooky spirit out to give you a scare!

Your scarf is a hula skirt, can you make it sway?
Swing your hips from side to side as ukuleles play

Your scarf is an ocean, waves are rolling into shore
They break upon the sand then rush out to sea once more

Your scarf is a cape
When you wear it you can fly
Now you have the power and you're free
Soaring through the sky -

Climbing and diving, circling a star
Landing in lands so far away -

We've seen so many things a scarf can be
Can you find other things a scarf could be?
Make believe puts magic in a piece of fabric
The power of pretending is the key

Follow up:
Can you think of other things your scarf could be? Go through your music collection and play different segments of classical, jazz and popular music. What images do they suggest? Create your own sequence of things to pretend with your scarf.

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5. Jolly Clock (Time on the hour)
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Mirror different positions of clock hands
• Identify numerals one through twelve
• Read a clock to state time on the hour.

Materials:
A large cardboard clock

Setting:
Children stand by their seats or in an open area. They face the cardboard clock. One person places the clock hands in positions to indicate the times named in the song.

Activity:
Use your arms to mirror the hands on the clock. During the chorus, dance in place as you circle and swing you arms anyway you like.

Lyric:

Chorus:
I am a jolly clock I am
See me dance and move my hands
How I love to tell the time of day
In the early morning light
Or when the stars come out at night
I can say most any time of day

I swing my hands to 10 o'clock,
see me saying 10 o'clock
I swing my hands to 4 o'clock,
see me saying 4 o'clock
I raise my hands to 12 o'clock,
see me saying 12 o'clock
I drop one hand to 6 o'clock,
see me saying 6 o'clock
I swing my hands to 7 o'clock,
see my saying 7 o'clock
I swing my hands to 3 o'clock,
see my saying 3 o'clock

Repeat Chorus

I swing my hands to 2 o'clock,
see me saying 2 o'clock
I swing my hands to 8 o'clock,
see me saying 8 o'clock
I raise my hands to 1 o'clock,
see me saying 1 o'clock
I drop one hand to 5 o'clock,
see me saying 5 o'clock
I swing my hands to 11 o'clock,
see my saying 11 o'clock
I swing my hands to 9 o'clock,
see my saying 9 o'clock

Repeat Chorus

Follow up:
After students have mastered telling time on the hour, they can move on to telling time on the half and quarter hour with the advanced version of "Jolly Clock" (#13).

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6. Months On The Move
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Name the months of the year
• Know your birthday month
• Understand 12 months make a year
• Create movement and act out imaginary situations.

Setting:
Participants seated in chairs or on the rug.

Activity:
This song presents movement imagery for each month of the year. When your birthday month is named, stand inside the circle (or come to the front of the room) and create motions that go with the words you hear in the song. During the last verse, select your favorite months and motions and create your own sequence of movements.

Lyric:
January jiggles like a juggler in the cold
February falls like a fluffy flake of snow
March goes marching up a wind blown mountain
April sprinkles showers and the flowers bloom again

May meets a monkey madly climbing up a may pole
June joins a jolly group of joggers in the park
July jumps joyfully to celebrate a nation
August waves, "aloha" and sails around the world

September must remember to scamper off to school
October's rolling over like a pumpkin in the leaves
November gathers fruit and nuts then nods in thankfulness
December does a dainty dance with reindeer on the roof

Now you see the months keep moving, one by one they go
Twelve make a year when you string them in a row
Months on the move, January, February, March, April, May
Months on the move, June, July, August, September, October
November, December Months on the move!

Variation:
Do the motions for all the months in order as they are named.

Follow Up:
Do the motions for your birthday month, and see if we can guess correctly.

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7. We Are All Alike
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Understand there are differences and similarities among people
• Appreciate diversity and uniqueness among individuals and cultures
• Recognize traits, needs, and emotions all people have in common.

Activity:
During the chorus, repeat each phrase like an echo. During the verses, point to your eyes, your skin, your whole body, and your heart as each is named.

Lyric:

Chorus 1:
Like each flake of snow floating through the sky
We are all unique, we are all alike
Take a look around, you will see it's true
You're a lot like me, I'm a lot like you

Verse 1:
Everyone has eyes, they come in different shapes
Some are brown, some are blue, some are gray or green
Everyone has skin, it comes in many shades
It may be dark, it may be light, or somewhere in between

Chorus 2:
Everybody lives, everybody breathes
Everybody needs, everybody dreams
Everyone is born and changes through the years
We can laugh and cry and share our hopes and fears

Verse 2:
We all have a body, any size will do
It may be thick, it may be thin, it could be short or tall
We all have a heart, let it beat with pride
A common bond goes on and on, we're people one and all!

Follow Up:
Think of ways you are like your classmates or family members. Think of ways you are different. Make a list of other living things. Note the ways they are alike and different.

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8. Colors In Motion (Mixing colors)
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Identify primary colors: red, blue and yellow
• Identify secondary colors: green, purple and orange
• Understand how primary colors mix to form secondary colors:
blue + yellow = green, red + blue = purple, red + yellow = orange
• Learn movement vocabulary and perform basic motor skills
• Develop coordination, balance and cardiovascular fitness.

Materials:
Color scarves, cards or ribbons; red, blue, yellow. green, purple and orange.

Setting:
Groups of six people, each with a different color and space to move freely. Activity: Start in a seated position. When your color is called, stand and do the motion described. Continue moving until you hear the words, "Everybody quickly jump up and sit down."

Lyric:
Red, stand up and nod your head
Purple, stand up and walk around red
Green and orange, stand and stretch
Blue and yellow, walk around green,
'cause blue and yellow make green

This is a song about colors
You see them all around
There is red on a stop sign, green on a tree
Blue in the sky and sea
Now everybody quickly jump up and sit down

Yellow, stand up and circle your shoulders
Orange, stand up and march around yellow
Purple and green, stand and bounce
Red and blue, jump around purple,
'cause red and blue make purple

This is a song about colors,
You see them all around
There is orange on a pumpkin, purple on a plum
Yellow on bananas yum, yum
Now everybody quickly jump up and sit down

Blue, stand up and balance on one foot
Green, stand up and jog around blue
Orange and purple, stand and wiggle
Red and yellow, hop around orange,
'cause red and yellow make orange

This is a song about colors,
You see them all around
It's about the happiest song in town
Everybody quickly jump up and sit down

Follow Up:
Can you create other ways you could move with your color? Show the motions created with "Colors In Motion (Basic)" (#3). How many colors can you name that were not used in this song? What is your favorite color? For a faster stand up and sit down activity using four colors (red, green, blue and yellow), try the song Colors from the recording Educational Activities.

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9. What's Bigger Than A Bear?
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Learn about opposites
• Recognize qualities of bigger-smaller, slower-faster, longer-shorter, louder-softer, brighter-dimmer, smoother-rougher, heavier-lighter
• Compare and contrast items based on these qualities

Setting:
Participants seated in chairs or on the rug.

Activity:
Listen to each question then sing it back like an echo. (After playing the recording, the teacher may ask the questions again, and children can share their answers.)

Lyric:
What's bigger than a bear?
Smaller than a chair?
Slower than a snail?
Faster than a whale?
Longer than a yardstick?
Shorter than a toothpick?
Louder than a cry?
Softer than a sigh?

We contrast this and that
Here, there and everywhere
But when it comes to you, my friend,
Nothing can compare

What's brighter than a flashlight?
Dimmer than the sunlight?
Smoother than a pine cone?
Rougher than a dog's bone?
Heavier than a bowling ball?
Lighter than a baseball?
Faster than a plane?
Slower than a train?

We contrast this and that
Here, there and everywhere
But when it comes to you, my friend,
Nothing can compare
Because you're one of a kind
And we're lucky to find
The one and only you!

Variation:
For an extra challenge, play "lightening mind." Answer each question as you listen to the recording. Although you have only a short time to respond, there are many correct answers from which to choose. For extra fun, work with partners or in small groups so you can share the many possible responses to each question.

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10. Seasons
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Name in order the four seasons
• Recognize how seasons divide the year into a repeating pattern
• Recognize that seasons bring changes in temperature, weather, and length of daylight.

Activity:
Act out the seasonal imagery in your own way. For example: • Days get longer.....stretch and lengthen • Days get shorter...bend and shorten • Days get warmer...expand • Days get colder...contract and shrink • Winter snow melts ...slow sustained fall • Flowers bloom...open and expand • Hibernating animals awake...start in stillness, pantomime waking up and searching for food.

Lyric:
The seasons are changing throughout the year
Touching each flower, river and tree
The seasons are changing throughout the year
Heating and cooling land and sea

Spring, summer, autumn, winter
Days grow longer, days grow shorter
Spring, summer, autumn, winter
Days grow warmer, days grow colder
In spring the winter snow melts
In spring the flowers bloom
And hibernating animals awake and go hunting for food

In summer we droop in the shimmering heat
Trees grow taller and offer their shade
Flies buzz about, cows flick their tails
And crickets and katydids sing a night serenade

In autumn the leaves change colors and fall
We harvest the grain and pick fruit from the trees
And birds fly south to winter homes
As rivers and lakes begin to freeze

In winter snow flakes swirl from the sky
In winter winds blow cold rain and sleet
And bears and squirrels, frogs and snakes
Snuggle up for a long winter's sleep

The seasons are changing throughout the year
Touching each flower, river and tree
The seasons are changing throughout the year
Heating and cooling land and sea
Spring, summer, autumn, winter
Spring, summer, autumn, winter

Follow up:
What is your favorite season?.....your least favorite season?.....Name things you like to do in each season. Draw a picture of your favorite season. Mark on a calendar when each season begins. In North America the dates are:
Spring, March 20 or 21
Summer, June 21 or 22
Autumn, September 22 or 23
Winter, December 21 or 22

Using a ball and a lamp, show how the tilt of the earth's axis never changes while the earth circles the sun. In which position does the top half of the ball (the northern hemisphere) receive the most light?.....the least light?.....Which season receives the most light?.....the least light? Why does the warmest and coldest weather generally occur several weeks after the beginning of summer and winter? (Oceans retain heat and cold) Can you name a country where it is summer at the same time it is winter where you live?

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11. Jumping To Add And Subtract
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Explore addition and subtraction facts 0-9
• Develop a sense of numbers and the relationship between numbers
• Develop motor skills of jumping forward and backward, starting, stopping and turning.
• Improve cardiovascular fitness
• Recognize a basic rhythmic pulse and play rhythm instruments a specified number of beats

Materials:
A set of 10 number cards approximately 4"x 6" with the numerals 0-9.
In a large group, one set can be shared by two participants.
Optional: A variety of rhythm instruments such as tambourine, sticks, triangle, cow bell, maracas, and wood block (see variation #1)

Setting:
The number cards are placed in a line on the floor with zero at one end and nine at the other end. The participants stand on either side of the numeral zero facing the other end of the line.

Activity:
We can add and subtract by jumping forward and backward. For example, let's jump the problem 2 + 3. Start standing by the numeral 0. Jump forward two times landing by a number card each time and ending by the 2 card. Jump forward three more times, landing by a card each time, arriving at the answer 5. When you hear the bell, run back to zero and listen for the next problem. To jump 5 - 3, start at 0 and jump forward five times ending by the 5 card. Jump backward three times arriving at the answer 2. Let's try these problems and more with music. During the instrumental section, make up your own problems.

Lyric:
Jumping is how you can add and subtract
It sounds funny but it can be done
Jump in a line from zero to nine
And I think you'll agree that it's fun

2 + 3, 2 + 3 is____, 5 - 3, 5 - 3 is____,
4 + 2, 4 + 2 is____, 4 - 4, 4 - 4 is____,

Jumping is how you can add and subtract
It sounds funny but it can be done

3 + 5, 3 + 5 is____, 1 + 6, 1 + 6 is____,
3 - 2, 3 - 2 is____, 5 + 4, 5 + 4 is____,

Now you pick the facts to add and subtract
With answers from zero to nine
You get to choose the numbers you use
And jump them on your number line
(16 bar instrumental)
Jumping is how you can add and subtract
It sounds funny but it can be done

Variations:
(1) Accompany the jumping with rhythm instruments. Play the number of beats that correspond to each number called then say the correct answer to each problem. For example: "Two" (play 2 times), "plus three" (play 3 times). "Two plus three is five" (call out the answer "five").
(2) Put the number cards away, and jump in an open area. Face any direction and create your own path in space as you jump forward and backward to add and subtract.

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12. Numbers Can Tell About You
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Learn numbers 0 - 9
• Recognize how numbers can describe attributes of people and their environment

Materials:
A set of number cards 0 - 9.

Setting:
This song uses the same setting and makes an excellent lead up or follow up activity to the song "Jumping To Add And Subtract." (#11)

Activity:
Answer the questions in this song by walking up and down the number line and stop-ping by the card that gives your answer. To show a multiple digit answer, stand by each number in order. To show multiple digit answers of the same number, for example 55, stand by five and jump two times. To show your phone number or address, walk to each number in sequence.

Variation:
Sit facing a partner and say your answers to each other or hold up the correct number of fingers to answer each question. (These activities require no materials, and can be done in a fixed seat setting.)

Lyric:

Chorus:
Numbers can tell about size and speed,
Time and temperature, too
They can tell us how many, how far, how high
And numbers can tell about you.

What time do you rise in the morning?
What time do you go to bed?
How many people are in your family?
How many pets do you have if any?
May we ask how old you are?
How old would you like to be?
What time do you get home from school each day?
Do you remember your phone number?

Ooh - numbers, ooh - numbers
Ooh - numbers can tell about you

How many books have you read this year?
How many hobbies do you have?
Do you have a favorite number?
If you could travel back in time, how far would you go?
Repeat Chorus

Follow up:
Make up your own questions. For example: How many times do you eat each day? How many times would you guess you breathe in a minute?.....your heart beats in 10 seconds?

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13. Jolly Clock (Advanced)
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Mirror different positions of clock hands
• Identify numerals one through twelve
• Read clock to state time on hour, half hour, and quarter hour
• Relate specific times to daily events.

Materials:
A large cardboard clock.

Setting:
Children stand by their seats or in an open area. They face the cardboard clock. One person places the clock hands in positions to indicate the times in the song.

Activity:
Use your arms to mirror the hands on the clock. During the chorus, dance in place as you circle and swing your arms any way you like.

Note:
It is not necessary for young children to understand all the concepts of telling time. They can simply mirror the positions of the clock hands, learning as they participate.

Lyric:

Chorus:
I am a jolly clock I am
See me dance and move my hands
How I love to tell the time of day
In the early morning light
Or when the stars come out at night
I can say most any time of day

Breakfast time is 6:30, see me saying 6:30
I go to school at 8:15, see me saying 8:15
Story time is 10:45, see me saying 10:45
I eat my lunch at 11:30, see me saying 11:30
I play with friends at 12:15, see me saying 12:15
Recess ends at 1:00 o'clock, see me saying 1:00 o'clock

Repeat Chorus

I leave my school at 3:15, see me saying 3:15
I read a book at 4:30, see me saying 4:30
Dinner time is 5:15 see me saying 5:15
I go to bed at 7:30 see me saying 7:30
The puppy barks at 9:45, see me saying 9:45
The baby wakes at 2:00 am see me saying 2:00 o'clock

Repeat Chorus

Variation:
Older children can play "Beat the Clock," attempting to tell the time with their arms before the clock hands arrive at the correct position.

Follow up:
What time do you get up?...go to school?...eat dinner?...go to bed? Try this activity using times various events happen in your daily routine.

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14. Betty Beep
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Count with comprehension
• Recognize one to one correspondence between patterns of sounds and numbers

Activity:
In each verse, count the sounds that keep Betty awake. For example, in the first verse count how many times the puppy barks. Next, count out loud as numbers are sung in order. Raise your hand when you get to the number of barks you counted. At the end of the song, we will add all the different noises and find the total number of sounds that kept Betty awake.

Lyric:
Betty Beep could not sleep
Her mother said, "Try counting sheep"
The lights went out, she lay back down
Then heard her puppy's barking sound
woof, woof, woof, woof, woof, woof, woof!
She counted barks instead of sheep
The noises never let her sleep
There were 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 barks

She flopped back down, tossed around
Then heard her cat's mee-ow-ing sound
mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow
She counted mee-ows instead of sheep
The noises never let her sleep
There were 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 mee-ows

She flopped back down, tossed around
To baby sister's crying sound waah, waah, waah,
She counted cries instead of sheep
The noises never let her sleep
There were 1, 2, 3 cries

She flopped back down, tossed around
Then heard a trucker's honking sound
beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep, beep
She counted beeps instead of sheep
The noises never let her sleep
There were 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 beeps

She flopped back down, tossed around
Next came grandpa's snoring sound
snore, snore, snore, snore, snore, snore,
She counted snores instead of sheep
The noises never let her sleep
There were 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 snores

And Betty screamed,
"Seven, plus five, plus three, plus eight, plus six!
I've heard twenty-nine noises now
I need to sleep but I don't know how."
Daddy said, "Here's just the thing."
And he began to softly sing:

Twenty-nine bunnies go bouncin' along
Twenty-nine bunnies bounce
If one of those bunnies should snuggle in bed
Twenty-eight bunnies go bouncin' along
(Similarly.....)
Twenty-eight bunnies go bouncin' along.....
Twenty-seven bunnies go bouncin' along.....
(Counter melody)
Betty's eyelids gently fell as daddy sang this song
The story's done but if you like,
The song goes on and on.....
Twenty-six bunnies go bouncin' along.....
(Continue pattern as long as desired)

Follow up:
Are there any sounds that wake you up at night? Can you make the sound with you voice? Make the sound one to ten times and we will count. Now let's sit quietly and listen for sounds.....describe the sounds you heard. How many different sounds did you hear?

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15. Toss It High Let It Fly
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Identify and name parts of the body
• Reinforce spatial concepts of up, down, high, low, over, and under
• Develop motor skills of throwing and catching
• Enhance eye hand coordination

Materials:
A scarf for each participant.

Activity:
Listen to the introduction, then toss your scarf up high and let it land on various body parts as they are named. For easier control of the scarf, keep holding one corner as you lift it high and let it fall.

Lyric:
When you toss your scarf up high
Like a bird it rises to fly
Then gently it falls toward the floor
'Til you catch it and toss it once more

Let it fly and land on your arm
Let it fly and land on your leg
Let it fly and land on your elbow
Let it fly and land on your foot

Toss it high, let it fly
And float down to the floor
Now you leap and fly over the scarf
Then fetch it and toss it once more

Let it fly and land on your hand
Let it fly and land on your head
Let it fly, fly, as you turn underneath
Toss it up high and spin, spin around
Let it fly, fly, as you turn underneath
Now throw it and catch it and slowly sit down

Follow up:
Can you name the parts of your body on which the scarf landed? Can you think of body parts which were not named? Create other ways you could move while throwing your scarf in the air. For other activities with your scarf, try the songs "Magic Scarf" (#4) and "Colors In Motion" (#3 or #8).

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16. Rhyme Time Band II
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Recognize word ending families
• Focus on patterns of constructing words (onsets and rimes)
• Identify parts of the body
• Explore a variety of ways we can move

Setting:
Stand in front of seats, or spread out in an open area.

Activity:
In each verse you will hear three words that rhyme. Move a part of your body that also rhymes with these words. You need not wait to hear all three words. Move as soon as you can.

Lyric:
Rub a part of your body that rhymes with rack
Rhymes with sack, rhymes with tack
...Everybody rub your back

Wiggle a part that rhymes with rung,
Rhymes with young, rhymes with sung
...Everybody wiggle your tongue

Walk on parts that rhyme with rose
Rhyme with nose, rhyme with close
...Everybody walk on your toes

Wrinkle a part that rhymes with pace
Rhymes with ace, rhymes with trace
...Everyone make a funny face!

Chorus:
We're the Rhyme Time Band
The prime time sound in all the land
We're the Rhyme Time Band
Come on and join the fun!

Tense and relax some parts that rhyme with rustles
Rhyme with tussles, rhyme with hustles
...Tense and relax your muscles

Feel something beating that rhymes with cart
Rhymes with dart, rhymes with start
...Everybody feel your heart

Click some parts that rhyme with wreath
Rhymes with heath, rhymes with Keith,
...Everybody click your teeth

Hop on a part that rhymes with put
Rhymes with soot, rhymes with (sing) doot, doot, doot, doot, doot
...Everybody hop on your foot

Repeat Chorus
In the Rhyme Time Band

Follow Up:
Name a part of your body you did not move with this song. Can you think of words that rhyme with this body part? Sing this song again using your own ideas. You can also do this activity with things around the room. For example, point to something in the room that rhymes with cable, label, and stable.

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17. Thirty Second Challenge
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Recognize and identify numbers
• Understand number order
• Develop motor skills of running, jumping, and turning
• Develop agility, speed and endurance.

Materials:
• Number cards 1 - 3 for younger children
• Number cards 0 - 6 or 0 - 9 for older children
• 2 or 4 blocks of wood 6" to 18" high
• 1 or 2 hardwood dowels 3' long.

Setting:
Set up a hurdle using two blocks to hold up a 3' dowel as cross bar. For younger children set up one hurdle 6" high. For older children, set up two hurdles 12"- 18" high. Establish a starting line 4 - 8' from first hurdle. Place the number cards 4 - 8' beyond last hurdle.

Activity:
This activity can be fun and challenging for children grades K through 7. For younger children use fewer numbers and lower hurdles. For older children use more numbers and higher hurdles.

The challenge is to pick up the number cards one at a time, in order and return them to the starting line within 30 seconds. Begin running when you hear the sound of the starting gun. Pick up one card at a time and jump the hurdles each time you move back and forth over the course.

The song repeats three times. During the second repetition, replace the numbers at the other end of the course. During the third repetition, once again, collect the numbers in order and bring them back to the starting line.

Lyric:
When you hear the starting gun,
Clear those hurdles jump and run
Pick up cards one by one
You've got thirty seconds to get it done
If at first you don't succeed
One more chance is all you need
You can learn to pick up speed
You've got thirty seconds to get it done
Thirty seconds to jump and run
Thirty seconds of thrills and fun!
It's the thirty second challenge

Tick tock Mr. Clock
says you don't have very long
Tick tock Mr. Clock
says the time's all gone

(Repeat as instrumental)

(Repeat with vocal)

Variations:
Here are two possibilities for working with groups of children:

(1) Set up two courses. Work in relay teams of six to nine people. The number of team members corresponds to the number of cards used. Each person brings one number card back to the starting line helping the team collect all the numbers, in order, within 30 seconds. During the second repetition of the song, the teams return the number cards in order. During the third repetition, the team members once again collect the numbers in order.

(2) Work in relay teams of five people on each team. Place the number cards 0 - 9 at the far end of the course. Each person finds two numbers that total 9 and brings them back to the starting line. There are five possibilities, one for each team member: 5+4, 6+3, 7+2, 8+1, 9+0. During the second repetition of the song, each person returns the number cards to the far side of the course. During the third repetition, each person finds a different set of facts that total nine.

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18. It's Time To Go
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Objectives:
• Signal the end of an activity and a time for transition
• Reinforce concepts of past, present and future
• Encourage verbal expression and communication.

Activity:
Learn and sing this simple song. During the instrumental section, face someone near you and communicate something you are looking forward to doing.

Lyric:
It's time to go, farewell and good-bye
The clock keeps ticking, the day moves along
It's time to go, farewell and good-bye
We're saying so long with a song

You may be sad when things come to an end
But something surprising could be 'round the bend
Remember the old and welcome the new
And savor each moment whatever you do
(Instrumental)
(Repeat verse 2)

It's time to go, farewell and good-bye
The world keeps turning, the days move along
It's time to go, farewell and good-bye
We're saying so long with a song
Saying so long with a song

Follow Up:
What are you doing right now? What was your favorite part of the day? What was your least favorite part of the day? Draw a picture of something you did in the past and something you are looking forward to doing in the future.

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Credits:
Produced by: Hap Palmer and Miriam Mayer Arranged by: Miriam Mayer  Recording Engineer: Mark Creamer Lead Vocals: Hap Palmer Background Vocals: Karen Harper, Scotti Haskell, Luanna Jackman, Hap Palmer Additional Background Vocals: Wanda Houston, Molly Pasutti, Robin Tapp Children's Chorus Director: Jane Rollins Children's Chorus: Ali Franzen, Brette Gentry, Kathy Hoyle, Jessica Nelson, Nick Rollins, Tami Rollins, Tosha Scarfe, Joey Wiebe Guitars: Grant Geissman, Hap Palmer Keyboards: Steve Kaplan Drums: Tom Walsh Bass: Jim Garafalo Percussion: MB Gordy Saxophone: Jennifer Vaccaro, Mike Vaccaro, Hap Palmer  Piccolo, Flute: Jennifer Vaccaro, Mike VaccaroClarinet, English Horn: Mike Vaccaro Trumpet: Stu Blumberg Violins: John Wittenberg, Norman Hughes, Gina Kronstaad, Kathleen Robertson, Susan Chapman Violas: Helaine Wittenberg, Marcie Dicterow Cellos: Stefanie Fife, Glen Grab Harp: Stephanie Bennett Fiddle: Miriam Mayer Tuba: John Van Houten Banjo, Madolin: Grant Geissman Lap Steel Guitar: Mark Creamer Harmonica: Hap Palmer Cries: Claralyse Yau Jen Palmer Educational Consultant:  Angelia Leung Production Assistance: Tom Perry Assistan Engineers: Joe Belamy, Eva Armanto Designed and Illustrated by: Carole Schumacher Onaitis Guidebook Editors: Paula Benjamin Little, Kelly Palmer, Raelynne Rein, Phd

All songs published by Hap-Pal Music. ©Hap-Pal Music all rights reserved. No part of these lyrics or activities may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without permission from the publisher.

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