Multiplication Mountain

Introduction
The multiplication facts in this album are presented in the order that most students find easiest to learn. We start with the 2s, 5s, 10s, and 11s tables on the first level of the Multiplication Mountain.

With each fact you learn on the first level, you learn a fact you will find further up the mountain. For example, because 2 x 9 = 18, and 9 x 2 = 18, you learn a 2x fact and a 9x fact at the same time!

Multiplication facts are easy to learn if you slowly but steadily climb the Multiplication Mountain. Start on the bottom and climb from left to right. With every step there is one less fact to learn, and by the time you’ve climbed the mountain and reached the sun. . .you only have one fact to learn: 12 x 12 is 144. Enjoy the climb!

Each table has its own catchy song to help you memorize the facts. Lots of musical styles are included to make the climb interesting and fun.

Notes and Helpful Hints

The times tables are presented in the order most students find easiest to learn. However, for some students, this exact order may not be the best. For example, some students may find the 4s easier than the 9s, or the 7s easier than the 8s. You can change the order to fit the needs of the student(s) with whom you are working.

Numbers in parenthesis ( ) are versions with no answers. These fill-in-the-blanks versions can be used after the student has learned the particular time table or as a diagnostic test.

Track 26 is an instrumental version of “Shake Up The Tables” where teacher and students can choose the facts and sing them with the musical accompaniment.

You can use music in combination with other learning methods such as movement activities, pictures, and rhymes. This teaching guide presents activities to accommodate different learning styles.

The ideas in this guide are suggestions. Feel free to adapt and change them to fit your environment and meet the needs of the students.

1. The Twos Give You Twice
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

This song shows that multiplying by twos is the same as doubling a quantity. The melody is in the form of a 12 bar blues with a swinging shuffle beat.

Lyrics:
The twos give you twice
what you had before
From one to two and two to four
All you have to do is double every number
A five foot board becomes ten feet of lumber
A six bar tune becomes a twelve bar blues
You can double any number you choose

2 x 1 is 2, 2 x 2 is 4, 2 x 3 is 6
2 x 4 is 8, 2 x 5 is 10, 2 x 6 is 12
2 x 7 is 14, 2 x 8 is 16, 2 x 9 is 18
2 x 10 is 20, 2 x 11 is 22, 2 x 12 is 24

The pattern stays stable through the whole twos table
And on and on Just as long as you’re able
You can multiply a million
You can multiply a billion
You can double any number you choose

Repeat Tables

Double three bees you get six bees buzzin’
Double six cakes you get twelve makes a dozen
‘Cuz the twos give you twice what you had before
From just two cups you get four to pour
A five day trip becomes a ten day cruise
You can double any number you choose

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2. Tens Trip Off Your Tongue
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

The tens are among the easiest tables for children to learn. Multiplying by 10 is as easy as counting by 10s, and that’s how we open this reggae/calypso flavored tune.

Lyrics:
10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, and I guess that’s plenty

The tens just trip right off of your tongue
It’s the easiest thing that you’ve ever done
The simplest song you’ve ever sung
The tens just trip right off of your tongue

10 x 1 is 10, 10 x 2 is 20, 10 x 3 is 30
10 x 4 is 40, 10 x 5 is 50, 10 x 6 is 60
10 x 7 is 70, 10 x 8 is 80, 10 x 9 is 90
10 x 10 is 100, 10 x 11 is 110, 10 x 12 is 120

Repeat Tables

The tens just trip right off of your tongue
It’s the easiest thing that you’ve ever done
The simplest song you’ve ever sung
The tens just trip right off of your tongue
Ooh la, la, la, la, la, la, la

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3. Fives Alive
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

The fives have a simple pattern that is easily learned. Here the facts are sung with a jazzy rhythm interspersed by improvised solos on piano, saxophone and trumpet.

Lyrics:
Fives can be exciting
And music makes them fun
And with a jazzy jive
We bring the fives alive
Join in everyone!

5 x 1 is 5, 5 x 2 is 10, 5 x 3 is 15
5 x 4 is 20, 5 x 5 is 25, 5 x 6 is 30
5 x 7 is 35, 5 x 8 is 40, 5 x 9 is 45
5 x 10 is 50, 5 x 11 is 55, 5 x 12 is 60

Fives can be exciting
And music makes them fun
And with a jazzy jive
We bring the fives alive
Join in everyone!

Repeat Tables

Fives can be exciting
And music makes them fun
And with a jazzy jive
We bring the fives alive
Join in everyone
I really mean it
Hey! Let’s bring the fives alive!

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4. Elevens Have Those Doubles
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

The elevens are another easy table to learn because of the double numbers that make up most of the answers. Only 3 facts need to be memorized: 11 x 10 = 110, 11 x 11 = 121, and 11 x 12 = 132.

Lyrics:
Elevens have those doubles
And they’re hardly any trouble
You can learn them in no time
‘Cause there’s a rhythm and a rhyme
Like twenty-two and thirty-three
It’s so easy don’t you see
You’ll be surprised how fast they’re memorized

11 x 1 is 11, 11 x 2 is 22, 11 x 3 is 33
11 x 4 is 44, 11 x 5 is 55, 11 x 6 is 66
11 x 7 is 77, 11 x 8 is 88, 11 x 9 is 99
11 x 10 is 110, 11 x 11 is 121
11 x 12 is 132

Elevens have those doubles
And they’re hardly any trouble
You can learn them in no time
‘Cause there’s a rhythm and a rhyme
Like twenty-two and thirty-three
It’s so easy don’t you see
You’ll be surprised how fast they’re memorized

Repeat Verse One and Tables

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5. Waltzing Through The Threes
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

The rhythm of a waltz is a series of repeating 3 counts. It is an especially appropriate form for singing the threes table. The 3/4 time meter and a rich orchestral sound give a change of pace that helps achieve one of the important goals of this recording: to provide musical variety and make each table unique and memorable.

Lyrics:
One, two, three, one, two, three
Waltzing with ease
The rhythm repeats
In groups of three beats
One, two, three, one, two, three
Math is a breeze
When waltzing through the threes

3 x 1 is 3, 3 x 2 is 6, 3 x 3 is 9
3 x 4 is 12, 3 x 5 is 15, 3 x 6 is 18
3 x 7 is 21, 3 x 8 is 24, 3 x 9 is 27
3 x 10 is 30, 3 x 11 is 33, 3 x 12 is 36

Repeat Verse One and Tables

One, two, three, one, two, three
Math is a breeze
When waltzing through the threes

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6. Number Nine Rollin’ Down The Line
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

The nines can be challenging, but when the pattern is recognized, the task becomes easy. With each answer, the tens digit goes up one and the ones digit goes down one – e.g. 18, 27, 36. Activities for showing this pattern are presented on page 11 of this guide. The musical style of the nines song is a fusion of rock and country - a form that is often called “rockabilly.”

Lyrics:
The number nine is rolling down the line
Heading on down to Caroline
I’m counting the cars as they roll on by
Strummin’ my guitar as I multiply

9 x 1 is 9, 9 x 2 is 18, 9 x 3 is 27
9 x 4 is 36, 9 x 5 is 45, 9 x 6 is 54
9 x 7 is 63, 9 x 8 is 72, 9 x 9 is 81
9 x 10 is 90, 9 x 11 is 99, 9 x 12 is 108

The number nine is rolling down the line
Pulling ninety-nine boxcars right behind
She’ll grab nine more down in Baltimore
That’s a hundred eight and she can’t be late

Repeat Tables and Verse 3

Got to keep on rollin’ so she won’t be late


7. Rockin’ The Fours
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

It’s easy to find things that come in groups of four: the legs on a chair, the paws on a bear, and the sides of a square. Couple this with the fact that most popular music is in 4/4 time and you have the theme of this song: fours are everywhere!

Lyrics:
With four legs on a chair
Four paws on a bear
Four sides on a square
Fours are everywhere

With four counts to the bar
And a wailing guitar
We go one, two, three, four
Rockin’ the fours

4 x 1 is 4, 4 x 2 is 8, 4 x 3 is 12
4 x 4 is 16, 4 x 5 is 20, 4 x 6 is 24
4 x 7 is 28, 4 x 8 is 32, 4 x 9 is 36
4 x 10 is 40, 4 x 11 is 44, 4 x 12 is 48

With four legs on a bed
Four walls on a shed
Four paws on a hound
Fours are all around

Repeat Verse 2 and Tables

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8. Let’s Multiply By Six
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

A guitar has six strings and is an ideal image to show multiplication by six. This song opens with the six strings of a guitar being plucked one at a time. More guitars are gradually added until six guitars (36 strings) are strumming. When the rest of the bluegrass band joins in, we’re ready to sing the six tables.

Lyrics:
One guitar has six strings
Two guitars have twelve
Three guitars have eighteen
And four have twenty-four
Five guitars have thirty strings
Six have thirty-six
Now as each player plucks and picks
Let’s multiply by six

6 x 1 is 6, 6 x 2 is 12, 6 x 3 is 18
6 x 4 is 24; Now let’s do some more
6 x 5 is 30, 6 x 6 is 36, 6 x 7 is 42
6 x 8 is 48; Hey, you’re doin’ great!
6 x 9 is 54, 6 x 10 is 60, 6 x 11 is 66
6 x 12 is 72; Yes, you know it’s true

We’re learning multiples of six
With music every answer sticks
And as each player plucks and picks
We multiply by six

Repeat Tables and Last Verse

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9. Eights – Shimmy, Shimmy Shake
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

This song is built around a series of electronic rhythm loops that combine to form a poly-rhythmic groove that motivates learners to memorize the 8s. It’s even more fun when you dance and sing along at the same time!

Lyrics:
We shimmy, shimmy shake
As we multiply by eight
With a hyper-funky beat
That really motivates
We get up in the morning
Feeling, oh, so great
Movin’ with the rhythm
That the band creates

8 x 1 is 8, 8 x 2 is 16, 8 x 3 is 24
8 x 4 is 32, 8 x 5 is 40, 8 x 6 is 48
8 x 7 is 56, 8 x 8 is 64, 8 x 9 is 72
8 x 10 is 80, 8 x 11 is 88, 8 x 12 is 96

Repeat First Verse and Tables

We shimmy, shimmy shake
As we multiply by eight
With a hyper-funky beat
That really motivates
Everyone to join the fun
And learn the eights!

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10. Sevens – Almost To The Top
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

The sevens are placed at the top of the mountain because they are often the hardest to learn. The melody gradually modulates upward to give the feeling of climbing a mountain. The style is “cool jazz” and the tempo is not too fast, providing ample response time to sing the answer.

Lyrics:
We’re almost to the top of Multiplication Mountain
The sevens are the tables that’ll take us there
We’re almost to the top of Multiplication Mountain
The sevens are the tables that’ll take us there
With the seven times we can make the climb
And the sevens are the tables that’ll take us there

7 x 1 is 7, 7 x 2 is 14, 7 x 3 is 21
7 x 4 is 28, 7 x 5 is 35, 7 x 6 is 42
7 x 7 is 49, 7 x 8 is 56, 7 x 9 is 63
7 x 10 is 70, 7 x 11 is 77, 7 x 12 is 84

Repeat First Verse and Tables

Oh we’ve made it to the top of Multiplication Mountain
The sevens are the tables that took us there
We’ve made it to the top of Multiplication Mountain
The sevens are the tables that took us there
With the seven times we’ve made the climb
And the sevens are the tables that took us there

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11. Twelves – Reach For The Sun
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

When you’ve climbed the Multiplication Mountain, you’re ready to reach for the sun and do the twelves. Best of all, you’ve already learned the twelves on your journey up the mountain. Just reverse the multipliers with each fact you hear. The answer stays the same. For example, if you hear “2 x 12 is 24,” say, “12 x 2 is 24.” There is only one new fact you need to learn: 12 x 12 is 144.

Lyrics:
The twelves are the tables
Where you reach for the sun
You’ve made it to the top
And you’re almost done
Just take the facts you already know
Turn ‘em around and you’re ready to go

1 x 12 is 12, 12 x 1 is 12
2 x 12 is 24, 12 x 2 is 24
3 x 12 is 36, 12 x 3 is 36
Take the facts you already know
Turn ‘em around and you’re ready to go

4 x 12 is 48, 12 x 4 is 48
5 x 12 is 60, 12 x 5 is 60
6 x 12 is 72, 12 x 6 is 72

7 x 12 is 84, 12 x 7 is 84
8 x 12 is 96, 12 x 8 is 96
9 x 12 is 108, 12 x 9 is 108
Take the facts you already know
Turn ‘em around and you’re ready to go

10 x 12 is 120, 12 x 10 is 120
11 x 12 is 132, 12 x 11 is 132
12 x 12 is 144
One hundred forty-four
You’ve done them all
And you’re ready to soar!

The twelves are the tables
Where you reach for the sun
You’ve made it to the top
And you’re almost done
The twelves are the tables
Where you reach for the sun!

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12. Fours Bonus – Twelve Race Cars
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

This is another way of looking at the fours. It’s one of the two song ideas I had for presenting the fours tables. I couldn’t decide which approach I preferred so I polled the students and teachers. The vote came out almost even, so I decided to keep both and include this one as a bonus song.

Lyrics:
Each race car has four wheels
‘Round the race track engines roar
How many wheels are rolling by?
Let’s multiply the cars by four

4 x 1 is 4, 4 x 2 is 8, 4 x 3 is 12
4 x 4 is 16, 4 x 5 is 20, 4 x 6 is 24
4 x 7 is 28, 4 x 8 is 32, 4 x 9 is 36
4 x 10 is 40, 4 x 11 is 44, 4 x 12 is 48

Multiplication by four reveals
Twelve race cars have forty-eight wheels
Count the cars and multiply
Four times twelve and you’ll know why
Twelve race cars have forty-eight wheels

Repeat Tables

Multiplication by four reveals
Twelve race cars have forty-eight wheels
Count the cars and multiply
Four times twelve and you’ll know why
Twelve race cars have forty-eight wheels

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13. Shake Up The Tables
Words and Music by Hap Palmer

The challenge with this song is to call out the answers when the facts are presented in a random order. This version has 24 of the easier facts. There are only 6 answers for all 24 facts: 12 18 20 24 30 40. You can easily put out number cards and play the game “Point To The Product”. The first goal of this song is to show that you can reverse the multipliers and the answer remains the same. Students listen to each problem then reverse the multipliers and sing it back. They call out the answer in the short instrumental break which follows.

Lyrics:
Shake ‘em up, mix ‘em up
Shake up the tables is the game we play
Shake ‘em up, mix ‘em up
It’s fun to hear them in a different way

2 x 6, 6 x 2, 10 x 4, 4 x 10, 2 x 9, 9 x 2
You can change them and rearrange them in any order you choose
5 x 6, 6 x 5, 3 x 4, 4 x 3, 5 x 8, 8 x 5
You can change them and rearrange them in any order you choose

Repeat First Verse

2 x 12, 12 x 2, 10 x 3, 3 x 10, 5 x 4, 4 x 5
You can change them and rearrange them in any order you choose
3 x 6, 6 x 3, 2 x 10, 10 x 2, 3 x 8, 8 x 3
You can change them and rearrange them in any order you choose

Follow-up:
Track #26 has instrumental verses for this song where you can choose the facts, mix them up any way you wish, and sing them with the musical accompaniment. You can use problems that are more challenging to learn. For example: 6 x 7, 7 x 6, 6 x 9, 9 x 6, 7 x 8, 8 x 7, 7 x 9, 9 x 7, 8 x 9, 9 x 8, 6 x 12, 12 x 6. There are only 5 answers for all 12 facts: 42, 54, 56, 63, 72.

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Multiplication Activities
Any of these activities can be used with any of the tables. I have found that some activities work especially well with certain tables and have listed these under a “Best for” heading. However, you may come to different conclusions based on your situation and the students with whom you are working. Feel free to try different possibilities.

Read And Sing
Materials: Multiplication facts and words to the song are displayed in large print on poster board.
Activity: Students receive both visual and auditory input as they read the lyric and sing along with the music.
Best for: All tables

Point To The Product
Materials: Number cards with products (answers) to a times table family. Number cards can be easily made using cardboard and felt pen.
Setting: Hang answers on the walls around the room.
Activity: Students listen to each multiplication problem, then face and point to the product.
Best for: Twos, Threes, Sevens, Eights, Nines, and "Shake Up The Tables".

Hold Up The Answer
Materials: Number cards with answers to a times table family. Example 8s: 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80, 88, 96.
Setting: 12 students seated on the floor, or in chairs. Each student has a number card.
Activity: Direct the students to: “Stand up when the card you are holding answers a
multiplication problem.”
Variation: To make this an individual activity, place the cards in a circle on the floor. The student stands inside the circle of number cards and holds up the card that answers
each problem.
Best for: All tables.

Run To The Answer
Materials: 12 number cards with answers to problems in a fact family.
Setting: The number cards are placed on the floor in a random order in an open area. One student stands by each number card.
Activity: In this activity there are 12 HAND WAVERS and 1 – 3 RUNNERS. The hand wavers take turns waving hands when they are standing by a number that answers a multi-plication problem. Aided by the hand wavers, the runners run to the number that answers each multiplication problem.
Variation: This activity can be done individually by placing the numbers in a line and having the student run up and down the line standing by the answer to each multiplication problem. Place the numbers in order or mix them up to make the challenge appropriate.
Best for: All tables

Multiples In Motion
Materials: Number cards with answers to multiplication problems from a fact family.
Setting: 12 students in a line or circle. Each student stands behind a number card.
Activity: Students begin moving when the answer they are standing by is called. Each student moves the number of body parts that corresponds to the number being multiplied (multiplicand).
For example, with the twos, each student shakes 2 hands.
2 x 1 is 2 – The student standing by the numeral 2 shakes 2 hands.
2 x 2 is 4 – The student behind the numeral 4 joins in so now 4 hands are moving.
2 x 3 is 6 – The student behind the numeral 3 joins in. Now there are 3 students, each shaking 2 hands for a total of 6 hands moving.
This continues in order until 2 x 12, where 12 students are each shaking 2 hands for a total of 24 hands shaking. This creates a concrete visual of what 2 x 12 looks like.
Best for: Twos: Shake hands. Fours: Run in place and circle arms to symbolize the 4 wheels of a race car. This activity works well with the song “Twelve Race Cars”. Fives: Nod head and shake 2 hands while bouncing or jumping on 2 feet. Tens: Wiggle
10 fingers.

Picture The Product
Students hold up pictures of objects that correspond to the multiplier.
For example, we could use spiders to illustrate the eights with the song “Eights – Shimmy, Shimmy Shake”.
Materials: • 12 cards, each showing a multiple of 8: 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80, 88, and 96. • 12 cards, each with a picture of a spider. These pictures can be made from construction paper and card stock. Children cut out an hour glass shape for the body and 8 legs, using black or any other color construction paper, and paste them onto card stock.
Children can also make spiders using 2 styrofoam balls (a large one for the abdomen and a smaller one for the head), and pipe cleaners for the legs.
For ideas for making spiders go to: www.happalmer.com
Setting: Cards with multiples of 8 are placed on the floor in order: 8, 16, 24, 32, etc. Each child stands behind a multiple of 8 and holds a picture of a spider.
Activity: Students are given the direction: "When the answer you are standing behind is called, hold up your spider". The observers see that each spider has 8 legs and view the number of legs increasing until finally 12 spiders have 96 legs. During the chorus of the song, the students wiggle their spiders and make them "shimmy and shake".
Best for: Threes: Tricycle (3 wheels); Triangle (3 points or sides) Fours: Horse (4 legs); Car (4 wheels) Fives: Starfish (5 points) Sixes: Guitar (6 strings) Eights: Spider (8 legs); Octopus (8 arms) Tens: Set of 10 bowling pins Twelves: Dozen donuts.

Partners Show The Product
Materials: Two sets of number cards 0 – 9
Setting: Two circles of number cards 0 – 9 are arranged side by side. One person stands inside each circle facing the front of the room. The observers are seated behind also facing the front of the room.
Activity: The partners work together to display the answer to each problem. The person on the left picks up the tens digit and holds it overhead and between the two circles. The person on the right picks up the ones digit and holds it over head and next to the tens digit. For example, to answer 6 x 7, the person on the left would hold up the 4 card and the person on the right would hold up the 2 card.
For one digit answers, the person on the left holds up the 0 number card. For example, to answer 3 x 2, the person on the left holds up the 0 card and the person on the right holds up the 6 to show the answer 06 like a digital watch.
The fives are a good table to start with because the pattern is easy to recognize. The person on the left (tens digit) stands inside a circle of the numbers 0 – 6. This person will hold up each card once or twice and then go in order to the next number. The person on the right (ones digit) needs only 2 cards 0 and 5. This person will answer every fact by alternately holding up the 5 and 0 card.
Variation: For the nines table, a group of 18 students stand in 2 lines of 9 and face each other. Each person holds a number card 0 – 9. The students come together in pairs in the center to show the answers. This is a good activity for showing the patterns in the 9s table. One line goes up the numbers in order and the other goes down the line in order. Three students need to come out to make the last answer: 9 x 12 is 108.
Best for: Fours, Fives, Sixes, Sevens, Eights, and Nines.

Stand By The Digit
Materials: A set of number cards 0 – 9.
Setting: Number cards placed in a circle 3 – 5 feet in diameter.
Activity: The student stands inside the circle of numerals. • For a one digit answer, stand by the answer on one foot. • For a two digit answer, place one foot by the ones digit, and the other foot by the tens digit. • For a three digit answer, place one foot by the ones digit, the other foot by the tens digit and a hand by the hundreds digit.
Variation: One person stands inside the circle and the other person stands outside the circle. The person inside the circle stands by the tens digit and the person outside the circle stands by the ones digit.*
*Activity suggested by Alan Cononico, former supervisor of Health and Physical Education, West Virginia.

Create Rhymes
Make up rhymes that students can chant with multiplication facts. This is especially helpful with some of the more difficult to memorize facts. For example:
8 x 9 is 72. Kate and Kline have plenty to do
7 x 8 is 56. Devin made a gate with nifty sticks
6 x 7 is 42. Fix the oven and more tea, too
4 x 8 is 32. Gordy ate his dirty shoe
Best for: Specific facts that students are having difficulty learning.

Finding Patterns
Zero Rule – Any number times 0 is always 0.
Ones Rule – Any number times 1 is always itself.
Twos Rule – Any number times 2 is the number doubled.
Nines Fingers Method – Hold out all 10 fingers and lower the finger that corresponds to the multiplier. For example, to answer the problem 9 x 7, hold out all 10 fingers and lower the 7th finger. There are 6 fingers to the left and 3 fingers on the right. The answer is 63.
Nines One Less Method – To get the answer to 9 x 6 = ?, subtract 1 from the number you are multiplying by 9, which in this example is 6. 6 - 1 = 5. This 5 will be the first digit in your answer. Interestingly, with each nines fact, the two digets that make up the answer always add up to 9. So, 5 + ? = 9. 5 + 4 = 9! Therefore, the last number in the answer is 4. 9 x 6 = 54.

Other Helpful Ways To Find The Answer
Break Problems into Smaller Units. Examples:
7 x 12 = (7 x 10) + (7 x 2) = 70 + 14 = 84
10 x 11 = (10 x 10) + (1 x 10) = 100 + 10 = 110
Move from Known to the Unknown. Examples:
8 x 9 = (8 x 10) - 8 = 80 - 8 = 72
7 x 8 = (7 x 7) + (7 x 1) = 49 + 7 = 56

Multiplication Terms
Commutative Property – An operation is commutative if you can change the order of the numbers involved without changing the result. Addition and multiplication are both commutative. This simply means it does not matter which number is first when you write the problem. The answer is the same.
Example: 2 x 3 = 6, 3 x 2 = 6
Division – The inverse of multiplication.
Factor – Any of the numbers that when multiplied together form a product.
Multiplication – A mathematic operation by which any number or quantity may be added to itself any number of times. Multiplication is repeated addition. 6 x 4 means 6 added together 4 times or 6 + 6 + 6 + 6.
Multiplication Fact – A multiplication problem with two factors and its answer. A multiplication fact contains the multiplicand, multiplier and product. 2 x 8 = 16.
Multiplicand – A number that is to be multiplied by another number. In the problem 2 x 8, 2 is the multiplicand.
Multiplier – The number by which you multiply another. In the problem 2 x 8, 8 is the multiplier.
Product – The result of multiplying two numbers or factors
Times Table Family – The same number multiplied by the numbers 1 – 12. For example, the six times table family would be 6 x 1, 6 x 2, 6 x 3, 6 x 4, 6 x 5, all the way to 6 x 12.

Multiplication Table


Among the 0 through 10 times tables, these are the multiplication facts that cause most difficulty.
6 x 7 = 42, 6 x 8 = 48, 4 x 12 = 48, 7 x 7 = 49
6 x 9 = 54, 7 x 8 = 56, 7 x 9 = 63, 8 x 8 = 64,
8 x 9 = 72, 6 x 12 = 72, 9 x 9 = 81
Source: www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise
Suggestion: Use the instrumental version of “Shake Up The Tables” to sing these challenging facts.

Credits:
Lead and Harmony Vocals: Hap Palmer
Children’s Chorus: Henry Beal, Briana Brooks, Anne Garafalo, Michael Hellard, Ivana Orozco, Megan Schulze
Vocals for "The Twos Give You Twice" and "Fives Alive": Megan Schulze,
Hap Palmer
Bass: Jim Garafalo, Hap Palmer
Acoustic Guitars: Hap Palmer, Larry Giannecchini
Electric Guitar, Mandolin: Larry Giannecchini
Saxophone, Flute: Hap Palmer
Trombone: Claralyse Palmer
Piano: Dean Mora
Horn Section: West Valley Horns
Horns Recorded at Tedesco Studio
Arranged and Produced by Hap Palmer and Miriam Mayer
Engineers: Hap Palmer, Miriam Mayer
Mix Engineer: Joe Belamy
Educational Consultants: Susan Diblasio, Angelia Leung, Kevin North, Angela Sandoval, Kelly Schulze
Co-lyricist of "Number Nine Rollin' Down The Line": Daniel Palmer
Guide Book Editors: Paula Benjamin Little, Miriam Mayer, Betty Williams
Designed and Illustrated by Carole Schumacher Onaitis
Guide Layout: Stan Onaitis

For more information, including a larger print version of this guide.
You can contact Hap at: hap@netwood.net

All songs published by Hap-Pal Music. ©Hap-Pal Music all rights reserved. No part of these lyrics or activities may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without permission from the publisher.

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