One Little Sound
Fun with Phonics and Numbers


Introduction

The objective of these songs is to stimulate oral language development. They are easy to learn and fun to sing. Some of the songs appear twice, once with complete lyrics and once with blank spaces where the children sing lyrics they have created and verbalized. After children have sung a song and are familiar with it they are ready for the Fill-In-The Blanks version. For instance, to do Grandmother's Farm, you might ask the children, "What are four more animals you could find on a farm? Write the four suggestions on the board. Then play the Fill-In-The Blanks version of Grandmother's Farm using the animals the children have thought of (For each song that has a Fill-In-The Blanks version, you will find a sample question for eliciting the children's responses.) Many of the songs have Instant Sing Lines. The Instant Sing Line is a phase or sentence that repeats itself throughout the song. Because it can be learned quickly, the children are able to participate right away.

Click Title for Lyrics:
1. Chickadee And Chipmunk
2. Bop 'Til We Drop
3. Marching Around The Alphabet
4. Ayee I Owe You
5. Mary And Marvin
6. Bounce


7. Follow Along
8. One Little Sound
9. D-O-G, Walkin' The Dog
10. Celebrate The Day
11. How Many Are Here?
12. Secret Word

1. Chickadee And Chipmunk
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Dividing words into syllables
Counting from 1 to 8
Number sound correspondence

Vocabulary
:
Chunk (a syllable), chickadee (one of a group of small birds with a black head and throat, gray wings, and white feathers on its underside), kookaburra (an Australian bird that makes a loud cackling sound like the sound of someone laughing), koala (an Australian animal that looks like a small bear but is actually a marsupial and lives in eucalyptus trees.) abracadabra, alligator, refrigerator

Activity:
This song starts with a short verse which sets a scene or tells a story. This is followed by a question which is repeated 3 times. Next, a word is slowly divided into "chunks" or syllables.
1. Sing the question which repeats 3 times.
2. Hold up fingers as each "chunk" or syllable is slowly spoken.
3. Count the number of fingers you are holding up and call out the number
  of chunks before the children on the recording give the answer.

Variations:
Clap as you sing the questions, and jump as you chant each chunk.
(For older children)
1. While singing the question, estimate the number of chunks.
2. Before the word is said slowly, hold up fingers to show your answer.
3. As we slowly count the chunks, you are free to change your answers whenever
you wish.

Lyric: (Pronunciation aids are shown in parenthesis.)
Said the chickadee to the chipmunk
"Tweedle-dee howdy doo
It's a beautiful day for singing a song
Here's a little tune about you"

How many chunks do you hear in chipmunk?
How many chunks do you hear in chipmunk?
How many chunks do you hear in chipmunk?
Say it slowly
CHIP - MUNK...Two! (chip-muhnk)

How many chunks do you hear in chickadee?
How many chunks do you hear in chickadee?
How many chunks do you hear in chickadee?
Say it slowly
CHICK - A - DEE...Three! (chik-uh-dee)

Said the kookaburra to koala
"Abracadabra, fly with me"
And the furry little friend began to fly
With a rolly polly tee hee hee

How many chunks do you hear in kookaburra?
How many chunks do you hear in kookaburra?
How many chunks do you hear in kookaburra?
Say it slowly
KOOK - A - BUR - RA...Four! (kuk-uh-bur-uh)

How many chunks in abracadabra?
How many chunks in abracadabra?
How many chunks in abracadabra?
Say it slowly
AB - RA - CA - DAB - RA...Five! (ab-ruh-cuh-dab-ra)

There's an alligator in my refrigerator,
Eating all my food
But I don't care, I like those words
So I'm in a happy mood

How many chunks do you hear in alligator?
How many chunks do you hear in alligator?
How many chunks do you hear in alligator?
Say it slowly
AL - LI - GA - TOR ... Four! (al-i-gay-tur)

How many chunks do you hear in refrigerator?
How many chunks do you hear in refrigerator?
How many chunks do you hear in refrigerator?
Say it slowly
RE - FRIG - ER - A - TOR ... Five! (ri-frij-uh-ray-tur)

Said the chipmunk to the chickadee
"Skidamarinkadinkadoo"
"It's a beautiful day for singing a song
Here's a little tune for you"

How many chunks in skidamarinkadinkadoo?
How many chunks in skidamarinkadinkadoo?
How many chunks in skidamarinkadinkadoo?
Say it slowly
SKI - DA - MA - RINK - A - DINK - A - DOO ... Eight!

Skidamarinkadinkadink, skidamarinkadoo, I Love You
Skidamarinkadinkadink, skidamarinkadoo, I Love You
I love you in the morning and in the afternoon
I love you in the evening and underneath the moon
Oh, Skidamarinkadinkadink, skidamarinkadinkadoo
I Love You, I Love You

Follow-up:
Who can think of a 2 syllable word?...a 3 syllable word?...a 4 syllable word?...You can also make up a word like rockatockamongo.

We can sing this song using your ideas. We need 2 words for each verse and we can included the names of the children who suggest the words. For example:
Said Marion and Wesley,
"Tweedle-dee howdy doo
It's a beautiful day for singing a song
Here's some words for you

Here are the number of syllable we need, to fit in each verse:
Verse 1 - a 2 syllable word and a 3 syllable word
Verse 2 - a 4 syllable word and a 5 syllable word
Verse 3 - a 4 syllable word and a 5 syllable word
Verse 6 - a 6, 7, or 8 syllable word
(For younger children, just use the first 1 or 2 verses)

Here are some examples:
2 syllable words: chopsticks, penguin, eyeball
3 syllable words: pagoda, pajamas, bicycle
4 syllable words: watermelon, huckleberry, helicopter,
5 syllable words: cafeteria, tyrannosaurus, observatory
6 syllable word: onomatopoeia (on-uh-mat-uh-pee-uh)
7 syllable word: alakazamakazoo
8 syllable word: supercalifragelistic

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2. Bop 'Til We Drop
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
'OP' word family
Initial consonants: B, H, P, M, O
Blends: CH, FL.

Vocabulary:
Hop, mop, chop, bop (dancing to jazz music), pop (to move suddenly, quickly; to explode or burst), flop, (to fall or drop limply, heavily) short 'O' sound

Activity:
(Teacher places the letters 'OP' on the board.) Who can think of a word that ends with the sound /op/? (Teacher lists words then circles any words that will be used in this song.) Let's try a fun way to play "freeze dance." When the music plays, do the motion that ends with OP. Stop moving when the music stops and listen for the next motion.

Lyrics:
Well let's bop, bop, 'til we drop
Dance 'til we hear the music stop
Bop, bop, 'til we drop
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op

Let's hop, hop, 'til we drop
Hop 'til we hear the music stop
Hop, hop, 'til we drop
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op

With the short O sound and the letter P
We can do so much it's plain to see

Let's pop, pop 'til we drop
Like kernels of corn on a hot stove top
Pop, pop 'til we drop
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op

Let's mop, mop 'til we drop
The floor's all sticky with slop and glop
Mop, mop til we drop
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op

With the short O sound and the letter P
We can do so much it's plain to see

Let's chop, chop til we drop
Pile logs in the shed right up to the top
Chop, chop til we drop
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op

Let's flop, flop til we drop
Like Raggedy Ann dolls in a toy shop
Flop, flop til we drop
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op

Let's /h/ op 'H' 'O' 'P', /p/ op 'P' 'O' 'P', /m/ op 'M' 'O' 'P',
/ch/ op 'C' 'H' 'O' 'P', /fl/ op 'F' 'L' 'O' 'P', /b/ op 'B' 'O' 'P',

Well let's bop, bop, 'til we drop
Dance 'til we hear the music stop
Bop, bop, 'til we drop
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op
Everything we do ends 'O' 'P' op

Follow-up:
What other words can you think of that end with the letters 'op'? (Examples: crop, shop, top, stop, drop, plop, stop, top)

I'm going to place six movement words on the board. Examples: JUMP, SLIDE, SKIP, RUN, SWING, STAMP, SHAKE, FALL
Let's move with the instrumental version (#14). During each pause, I will call out a word ending. Look at the board and find the word on the board which uses this ending and show in movement the word that fits.

Use other word families and find ways to move.
Examples:
'UMP' jump, bump, pump
'IDE' slide, ride, hide
'INK' blink, sink, wink
'OCK' rock, knock, block, walk, talk
'UG tug, shrug, hug
'AW' draw, saw, paw
'ASH' dash, mash, bash
'IP' skip, dip, sip, tip, flip
'ING' swing, sing, cling, fling
'AMP' stamp, clamp, tamp
As you listen to the instrumental version (#14), create your own ways to
move. After each pause, find a different way to move.

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3. Marching Around The Alphabet
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

This is a variation of one of my earliest songs. It encourages interaction between children.*

Subject:
Identifying letters of the alphabet A -Z
Recognizing initial consonant sounds
Problem solving and creativity
Working with a partner and sharing ideas

Vocabulary:
Actions: March, bend down, stand up, alphabet, whistle, letters A - Z.

Materials:
Make a set of alphabet cards using poster board, file cards or cardboard. Use a felt pen to write one letter on each card. Laminate the cards for durability.

Activity:
Let's place our alphabet cards in a circle on the floor then stand around the outside of the circle.
1. When you hear the music, march around the alphabet.
2. When the whistle blows, stop and stand by a letter.
3. Bend down and pick up the letter, and face someone who is standing near you.
4. Show and identify your letter to the person(s) you are facing.

Variations:
Share a word that begins with the letter you are holding.
Think of a 2 or 3 syllable word that begins with the letter you are holding.
Think of a word that fits a category: foods, places, animals, names, etc.
Share a word that begins with the letter your partner is holding.

Lyric:
We're marching around the alphabet
Around the alphabet
Passing letters from 'A' 'B' 'C'
All the way to 'X' 'Y' 'Z'
We're marching around the alphabet
Around the alphabet
Where we stop nobody knows
Until the whistle blows

Now bend down right where you are
Pick a letter that's near your toes
Face someone who's standing near
Show and tell the letter you chose
Show and tell the letter you chose

(Instrumental)

Put your letter back on the ground
Stand up tall and march around

Repeat All

We're marching around the alphabet
Around the alphabet
Passing letters from 'A' 'B' 'C'
All the way to 'X' 'Y' 'Z'

Follow-up:
Find other ways of moving around the alphabet. Examples: jumping, hopping, running. Sing this song with the instrumental version (#15) using your ideas.

Use this song for number recognition activities. Place the number cards 1 - 20 in a circle. Use the instrumental version (#15), to sing the following words.
We're marching around the number wheel
Around the number wheel
Passing numbers from 1,2,3,
All the way to twenty
We're marching around the number wheel
Around the number wheel
Where we stop nobody knows until the whistle blows
Now bend down right where you are
Pick a number that's near your toes
Face someone who's standing near
Show and tell the number you chose

You can also use the instrumental version for marching and playing rhythm instruments.

Note: In the original version, the teacher stands in the center of the circle and points to children who then call out the letter they hold. In this variation, children work in partners or small groups, and share answers with each other.
The original version is from Learning Basic Skills Through Music, Vol. I available from Educational Activities.

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4. Ayee I Owe You
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Vowels A, E, I, O, U, and sometimes Y
Addition
Concept of zero
A dollar as a unit of money

Vocabulary:
Owe (to have to pay money to someone, especially money that you have borrowed) borrow, dollar, one, two, three, zero, vowels

Activity:
This is a narrated story with a simple sing along song that repeats throughout. Listen to the story, sing along and answer the questions.

Story and Lyric:
I arrived at school one day and realized I had forgotten my lunch money.
I asked my friend Ayee, "Can I borrow a dollar?"
He said, "Sure".
"Thanks" I said.

Ayee I owe you one dollar
Ayee I owe you one dollar
Ayee I owe you one dollar
Thank you for helping me out

The next day I forgot my money again. How could I be so forgetful?
Ayee said "Don't worry about it. Just remember tomorrow."
So Ayee loaned me another dollar.
How many dollars did I owe Ayee in all?...Two!

Ayee I owe you two dollars
Ayee I owe you two dollars
Ayee I owe you two dollars
Thank you for helping me out

The next day ... I remembered! I brought a dollar for my lunch and the two
dollars I owed Ayee. How many dollars did I bring all together?...Three!
After I gave Ayee the two dollars I owed him, how much did I owe him?...
Nothing!

Ayee I owe you zero dollars
Ayee I owe you zero dollars
Ayee I owe you zero dollars
Thank you for helping me out

The next day Ayee came running up to me
"Can you help me out" he said. "I'm having a test on the vowels and I just
can't remember them
I said, "Ayee, how much do I owe you?"
He said, "Nothing"
"Right," I said "Ayee I owe you nothing
Now, change nothing to sometimes Y"
He said, "Why?"
I said, "sometimes Y"
He said, "Why?"
I said, "sometimes Y"
He shouted, "Why?"
I said, "because sometimes Y is a vowel. Now sing with me"

'A' 'E' 'I' 'O' 'U' and sometimes 'Y'
'A' 'E' 'I' 'O' 'U' and sometimes 'Y'
'A' 'E' 'I' 'O' 'U' and sometimes 'Y'
Now you know all of your vowels
Now you know all of your vowels

Follow-up:
When we name the vowels, we use the long vowel sound. Say each of the vowels using the short sound.

Name the vowel used by each of these words: ape, me, fine so, use cat, pet, win,
hot, tug

How much would you owe Ayee if he loaned you lunch money two days in a row, and each lunch cost 2 dollars? 3 dollars? Choose different number combinations and, sing this song with the instrumental version (#16).

The instrumental version of this song alternates between segments with a regular 3/4 rhythmic pulse, and softer segments with a free flowing quality. You can use this music for creative movement sessions. For example: When you hear the softer music slowly make yourself into a shape or statue. When you hear the louder rhythmic music, make your shape travel through space.

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5. Mary And Marvin
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

This song is the first half of a two part activity. After participating with this song, go to the next song, BOUNCE, where you will hear the action words used in MARY AND MARVIN presented in parts. Put the parts together and identify the words.

Subject:
Identification of body parts: hands, feet, hair, face
Alliteration and the letter sound M.
Coordination and motor skill development.
Pantomime and creative movement

Vocabulary
:
Hands, feet, hair, face, door, drum, banana, ball, knock, bang, peel, brush, itch, scratch, pump, bounce, wave

Activity:
Listen to the first two lines of this song: Mary and Marvin are marvelous monkeys, With millions of things they can do. How many words do you hear that start with the letter 'M'? Now let's listen to the whole song. Pantomime each motion first with your hands then with your feet.

Lyrics:
Mary and Marvin are marvelous monkeys
With millions of things they can do
What they can do with their fingers and hands
They can do with their toes and feet too

They knock on the door with their hands
They knock on the door with their feet
They bang on a drum with their hands
They bang on a drum with their feet
They pick a banana and peel it to eat
Using their hands or feet
They brush their hair with their hands
They brush their hair with their feet
When they itch they scratch with their hands
When they itch they scratch with their feet
They wash their faces so clean and neat
Using their hands or feet

Repeat First Verse

They pump up a ball with their hands
They pump up a ball with their feet
They bounce the ball with their hands
They bounce the ball with their feet
They wave goodbye with a smile so sweet
Using their hands or feet

Repeat First Verse

Follow-up:
Think of other things Mary and Marvin could do with hands and feet.

Here is an example of an alternate lyric you can sing with the instrumental version
(#17) of this song:

They stir with a spoon in their hands (feet)
They polish a car with their hands (feet)
They drive it away with the wheel in their hands
Or drive it away with their feet

They drink from a cup with their hands (feet)
They type out a note with their hands (feet)
They hold a pencil and write their names
Using their hands or feet

They plunk a guitar with their hands (feet)
They play a trombone with their hands (feet)
They bang on the bongos and join the band
Using their hands or feet

Work with a partner, and act out things Mary and Marvin could do together.
Examples: play ping pong, play pat-a-cake, scratch each others backs, talk in sign language, pedal a bicycle built for two.

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6. Bounce
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Initial consonants: D, F, H, B, H Blend: DR
Word Families: or, ace, air, all, anana, um, and, ump
Motor skill development
Pantomime and creative movement

Vocabulary
:
Door, face, hair, ball, banana, drum, hand, pump knock, wash, brush, bounce, peel, bang, wave, inflate

Activity:
In this song, you will hear many of the action words used in MARY AND MARVIN. Each word describes a motion. The word is presented in parts. Put the parts together and show the word by doing the motion.

Lyrics:
What can you knock that starts with a 'D'
Starts with 'D' and ends with or
I bet you can knock on a door
What can you wash that starts with an 'F'
Starts with 'F' and ends with ace
I bet you can wash your face

And what can you brush that starts with 'H'
Starts with 'H' and ends with air
I bet you can brush your hair
What can you bounce that starts with a 'B'
Starts with 'B' and ends with all
I bet you can bounce a ball

Everybody bounce, give it every ounce,
Everybody bounce, and you can learn your letter sounds

What can you peel that starts with a 'B'
Starts with 'B' and ends with anana
I bet you can peel a banana
What can you bang that starts 'D' 'R'
Starts 'D' 'R' and ends with um
I bet you can bang on a drum

And what can you wave that starts with 'H'
Starts with 'H' and ends with and
I bet you can wave your hand
What can you use for inflating a ball

It starts with 'P' and ends with ump
I bet you can use a pump - Hsss, hsss, hsss, hsss, hsss, hsss, hsss, hsss

Everybody bounce, give it every ounce,
Everybody bounce, and you can learn your letter sounds

Follow-up:
Here are some questions to help you create a new lyric which you can sing with the instrumental (#18) version of this song.
Think of something you could ride. (examples: horse, bike, train, plane)
What letter does the word begin with? How does it end?

Now let's use the word to create a new verse for this song. Example: What could you RIDE that starts with 'H'
Starts with 'H' and ends with orse?
I bet you could ride a horse.

You can create other verses starting with questions, and filling in the blanks. Here are some examples:
1. What could you BUILD that starts with ______?
Starts with ______ and ends with ______
(examples: table, house, fort)

2. What could you PLAY that starts with ______?
Starts with ______ and ends with ______
(examples: game - basketball, chess, musical instrument - drum, piano)

3. What could you FLY LIKE that starts with ______?
Starts with ______ and ends with ______
(examples: bird, plane, rocket, jet)

This question can lead into new words for the chorus:
Everybody fly, reach up to the sky
Everybody fly, and you can learn your letter sounds

Other possible categories for questions are:
What could you COOK ? PLANT? CLIMB? DRAW? SKATE ON / WITH?
The category of things you can skate on or with, can lead into new words for the chorus:
Everybody skate, hey, you're lookin' great
Everybody skate, and you can learn your letter sounds

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7. Follow Along
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Recognition of movement and counting patterns
Development of coordination and motor skills
Counting from 1 to 20, and counting by 4s
Identifying loud and soft beats

Vocabulary:
Pattern (a repeating arrangement) tap, pat, shake, touch, clap, whisper, hands, feet, knees, shoulders

Activity:
This song describes patterns of movement. We'll do each pattern first slowly, then faster, then combine the movement pattern with a counting pattern. You can create your own pattern of motions with the last verse.

Lyrics:
Step in place, step again
Shake your hands high over your head
Step in place, step again
Shake your hands so high

Pick it up, quicker now, ready set go:

Step, step, shake your hands
Step, step, shake your hands
Step, step, shake your hands
Join the joyful song

Now let's count to sixteen
With the moves you've just seen
Following a pattern as we go:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Touch your knees, touch your shoulders
Touch your head and clap your hands
Touch your knees, touch your shoulders
Touch your head and clap

Pick it up, quicker now, ready set go:

Knees, shoulders, head, and clap
Knees, shoulders, head, and clap
Knees, shoulders, head, and clap
Join the joyful song

Now lets count to twenty, whispering the first three
Shouting every fourth beat as we go
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Now this time it's your turn, you create a pattern Something we could follow as we go

Follow-up:
Create your own pattern or sequence of movements. Examples:
Jump, jump - clap, clap, clap,
Down, up, turn around,

Create a pattern that travels. Examples:
Jump - jump - run, run, run
3 soft steps, 1 loud step

Find your own counting pattern. Examples: count by 2s, 5s, 10s

Sing this song with the instrumental version (#19) using your ideas.

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8. One Little Sound
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Word families: ant, ox, eel, up, ark, all, ice, eat, ape, each, oil, end
Initial consonants: C, S, H, P, B, W, R, T, M
Adding and subtracting sounds (blending and segmentation)

Vocabulary:
Can't, ant, sox, ox, heel, eel, pup, up, Noah's ark, bark, wall, all, rice, ice, heat, eat, tape, ape, peach, each, soil, oil, mend, end, feisty, slimy

Activity:
In the first half of each line, the beginning sound of a word is removed, creating a new word. The second half of each line uses this new word in a short phrase. In the next part of the song, the challenge is to put the words back together and call out the answers before you hear it in the recording.

Variation:
After you have heard this song a few times, join in and sing the second half of each line and the whole fourth line of each verse. You can hear the children on the recording sing this pattern.

Lyrics:
Take the /c/ from can't and meet a feisty ant
Take the /s/ from sox, step past a sleepy ox
Take the /h/ from heel and hug a slimy eel
Oh, what a difference, just one little sound

Take the /p/ from pup and the pup is all grown up
Take the /b/ from bark, hear a dog in Noah's ark
Take the /w/ from wall, and you can see it all
Oh, what a difference just one little sound, add
/c/ and ant CAN'T
/s/ and ox SOX
/h/ and eel HEEL
/p/ and up PUP
/b/ and ark BARK
/w/ and all WALL
/m/ and ore MORE More? ... okay

Take the /r/ from rice, and the food is cold as ice
Take the /h/ from heat, warm it up and we can eat
Take the /t/ from tape and feed a hungry ape
Oh, what a difference, just one little sound

Take the /p/ from peach and serve a slice to each
Take the/s/ from soil, drill down and hunt for oil
Take the /m/ from mend and this song is near the end
Oh, what a difference just one little sound, add
/r/ and ice RICE
/h/ and eat HEAT
/t/ and ape TAPE
/p/ and each PEACH
/s/ and oil SOIL
/m/ and end MEND

Oh, what a difference just one little sound

Follow-up:
Let's find other words where we can remove the beginning sound and make a new word. Here are some helpful clues:
Something you drink out of that starts with 'C'

(CUP UP)
A common name for a dog that starts with 'R'
(ROVER - OVER)
Something you could use to sweep the kitchen
(BROOM - ROOM)
What you are standing on
(GROUND - ROUND )
Something you do with your brain
(THINK - INK)
A kind of pickle that starts with 'D'
(DILL -ILL)
A word for things like sox, shoes, and earrings that come in
groups of two (PAIR - AIR)
Something children like to play with that starts with 'B'
(BLOCKS - LOCKS)
Something hard that starts with 'S' and is found on the ground or
the bottom of a stream (STONE - TONE)
The top of a hill
(CREST -REST)
Something you measure with a scale
(WEIGHT - EIGHT)
Small animals that live in fields or homes and like to eat cheese.
(MICE -ICE)

Make a list of 12 words, then sing this song with the instrumental version (#20) using your ideas. You can simplify the lyric in the following way:
Take the /c/ from cup and now the word is "up"
Take the /r/ from rover and now the word is "over"
Take the /b/ from broom and now the word is "broom"
Oh, what a difference just one little sound

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9. D-O-G, WALKIN' THE DOG
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
'OG' word family
Initial consonants: D, F, L, B, H, M, J, P

Vocabulary:
Dog, fog, bog, hog, jog, misty, mucky

Activity:
Who can think of a word that ends with the sound /og/? (Teacher lists words then circles any words that will be used in this song.) Let's start with the word DOG. In each verse, we will drop the first letter and replace it with another. During the pause, the challenge is to call out the new word before you hear the answer on the recording.

Lyrics:
'D' 'O' 'G', I was walking the dog
Take off the 'D' use an 'F' fa, fa,
We walked into a misty fog

'F' 'O' 'G', a misty fog
Take off the 'F' use an 'L' la, la,
We tripped and tumbled over a log

'L' 'O' 'G', tripped over a log
Take off the 'L' use a 'B' ba, ba,
We fell into a mucky bog

'B' 'O' 'G', a mucky bog
Take off the 'B' use an 'H' ha, ha,
We bumped into a friendly hog

'H' 'O' 'G', a friendly hog
Take off the 'H' use an 'M' ma, ma,
The hog said, "Hi, my name is. Mog"

'M' 'O' 'G', my name is Mog
Take off the 'M' use a 'J' ja, ja,
He said, "Jump on" and he started to jog

'J' 'O' 'G', he started to jog
Take off the 'J' use a 'P' pa, pa,
He said, "Where to?" I said, "Pog Street"

'P' 'O' 'G', we live on Pog
Take off the 'P' use a 'D' da, da,
My little dog and I rode a hog named Mog
through the bog, past a log,
through the fog to our home on Pog Street...

Thank you Mister Mog
You're a mighty fine hog
I hope you join us again
And we'll go walkin' the dog

Follow-up:
Can you think of other words that end with the letters 'o' 'g'?
Examples: frog, cog, flog

Let's make 3 letter words with a different word family.
Examples:
IT - bit, fit, hit, kit, pit, sit,
AN - fan, ban, can, man, pan, ran, tan
OT - cot, dot, got, hot, jot, lot, not, pot, rot, tot

Make up a story with the words from one of these families. Sing the song with the instrumental version (#21)using your ideas.

The first measure of each melodic phrase emphasizes the beats 1, 2, and 3.
Create a rhythmic movement pattern which emphasizes these beats.
Examples: Clap, clap, clap, pause, sway, sway
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Jump, jump, jump, pause, slide, slide
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Try your pattern with the instrumental version (#21) of this song.

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10. Celebrate The Day
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Birthdays
Addition and subtraction
Animal sounds

Vocabulary
:
Celebrate, birthday, chickie, lamb, mirth (merriment, gaiety, the state of being
happy or merry)

Activity:
Is anyone having a birthday today? With this song we can celebrate everyone's birthday anytime of the year.
1. Hold up the number of fingers that shows how old you are.
2. Add one finger and show me how old you will be in one year.
3. How old will you be in 10 years? (You can add 10 years to your age by
holding up your 10 toes).
4. With your fingers, show me again how old you are today.
5. Now subtract one finger and show me how old you were one year ago.

The first part of this song celebrates your birthday. In the next part of the song, you can use your fingers and toes to answer each question. We'll end by singing our celebration song again.

Lyrics:
Let's celebrate the day of your birth
When you joined all the creatures on this earth
The chickie said "Peep," the lamb said "Baaah"
When you arrived, you hollered "Waaaaahh"

Now we're here to wish you
A very happy birthday
A merry full of mirth day
A welcome to this earth day
Happy Birthday to you!

How old are you today?
How old will you be in one year?
How old will you be in ten years?
How old were you one year ago?
My how you've grown!

Repeat verses 1 and 2

Follow-up:
Sing this song at a birthday party and use the name of the birthday child. For example:
Let's celebrate the day of Sarah's birth
When she joined all the creatures on this earth
The chickie said "Peep," the lamb said "Baaah"
When Sarah arrived, she hollered "Waaaaahh"

Create a new set of problems and sing this song with the instrumental version (#22).
For example:
How old is Sarah today?
How old will she be in 3 years? ... in 6 years?
How old was she 2 years ago?

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11. How Many Are Here?
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Addition facts to 10
Coordination of hands and fingers

Vocabulary
:
Add, sum, plus, merry, group, troop

Activity:
In this song two groups get to together to sing and dance. Hold up fingers to show each group. The fingers of one hand will be one group, and the fingers of the other hand will be the other group. Let your fingers dance with the music as you bring the two groups together. Count your fingers and call out the total.

Variation:
This can be done as a group movement activity. Dancing in a large open space, children form into groups and combine groups to illustrate the addition facts named in the song.

Lyric:
Oh, a merry group of 3 met a merry group of 2
They got together to sing and play
They said, "How many are here today?...3 plus 2 is 5

A merry group of 5 met a merry person 1
They got together to sing and play
They said, "How many are here today?...5 plus 1 is 6

A friendly group of 4 met another group of 4
They said "Let's get together and we'll have so many more"
Someone find the sum and say how many we have today?...
We're a jolly group, a traveling troop of 4 plus 4 is 8

Oh, a merry group of 4 met a merry group of 3
They got together to sing and play
They said, "How many are here today?... 4 plus 3 is 7

A friendly group of 5 met a friendly group of 4
They said "Let's get together and we'll have so many more"
Someone find the sum and say how many we have today?...
We're a jolly group, a traveling troop of 5 plus 4 is 9

Oh, a merry group of 5 met a merry group of 5
They got together to sing and play
They said, "How many are here today?...5 plus 5 is 10

Then everyone danced away, none remained to sing and play
Zero friends were left to say, "How many are here today?"

Follow-up:
Make up other problems that total 10 or less. Sing the song with the instrumental version (#23) using your choices.

Make up six problems with totals of 10 - 20. Sing the song again using your ideas. Work with a partner and use your fingers to show the problems and answers.

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12. Secret Word
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subject:
Blending individual phonemes to form words
Developing basic motor skills

Vocabulary
:
Jump, turn, hop, clap, wiggle, tiptoe, yawn, march

Activity:
The secret word tells you how to move, and the object of this game is to identify the word. You will hear the word in tiny little parts. Put the parts together and show in movement the meaning of the secret word. When the music stops, freeze. When the bell rings listen for the next word.

Variation:
After each letter sound is chanted, put the sounds together a little faster. Say them again faster still until you finally blend them together and say the "secret word." (This will help children recognize how the individual sounds come together to form a word).

Lyrics:
Have you heard the secret word?
Have you heard, have you heard?
Have you heard the secret word, do you know it?
If you listen to each part
Hear each sound right from the start
You will know when you string them all together

/j/ /u/ /m/ /p/...Jump!

/t/ /ur/ /n/...Turn!

/h/ /o/ /p/...Hop!

/c/ /l/ /a/ /p/...Clap!

Repeat Chorus

/w/ /i/ /gg/ /le/...Wiggle!

/t/ /i/ /p/ /t/ /oe/...Tiptoe!

/y/ /aw/ /n/...Yawn!

/m/ /a/ /r/ /ch/...March!

Repeat Chorus as marching band

Follow-up:
This song is made up of an introductory melody followed by 8 short melodic segments. In the vocal version, individual sounds or phonemes of the following words are chanted between the segments: jump, turn, hop, clap, wiggle, tiptoe, yawn, march. See if you can you recall the motion that goes with each melodic segment and move with the instrumental version of this song (#24).

Choose other movement words that go with each segment, and chant the individual sounds in the pauses. For example:
bounce, spin, hammer, tap, shake, creep, slump, stamp
(For more time, teacher can press the pause button on the CD or cassette player)

Choose animals that go with each segment. For example:
kangaroo, butterfly, bear, prancing horse
hummingbird, swan, turtle, elephant


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Credits
Recording Engineer: Joe Bellamy Arranger: Miriam Mayer
Lead Vocals: Hap Palmer Drums: Tom Walsh Bass: Jim Garafalo
Keyboards: Steve Kaplan, David Witham, Mary Falcone, Joe Bellamy
Guitar: Grant Geissman, Howard Anderson, Hap Palmer
Mandolin, banjo: Grant Geisman Tuba: Jim Van Houten Trumpet: Chris Tedesco Viola and Fiddle: Miriam Mayer Saxophone, flute, recorder: Mark Hollingsworth
Saxophone, flute, oboe: John Yoakum Recorder: Laura Haladay
Violins: Peter Kent, Daphne Chen Cello: Stephanie Fife
Background Vocals: Scotti Haskell, Shelby Daniels, Monique Donnelly
Susie Williams, Janis Liebhart, Steve Lively, Hap Palmer
Children's Chorus: Caitlin Scheffler, Carmel Echols, Joel Echols, John Hall, Laurie Schillinger, Francesca Riso, Amanda Williams Director: Diana Acuna
Guide Book Editors: Angelia Leung, Kelly Palmer, Jill Weinlein, Betty Williams
Designed and Illustrated by Carole Schumacher Onaitis
Guide Book Layout: Stan Onaitis
Produced by Hap Palmer All songs by Hap Palmer

Hap Palmer is an innovator in the use of music and movement for teaching basic skills and encouraging the use of imagination and creativity. His recordings and videos have received numerous honors including the Parents' Choice Gold Award, American Library Association Notable Recording Designation, American Library Association Best of the Best for Children, National Parenting Publications Award, American Video Award, Early Childhood News Directors' Choice Award,
Children's Music Web Awards Classic Recording for Toddlers,
Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Gold Seal Award

You can contact Hap at hap@netwood.net

Glossary of Reading Terms:

alliteration words that begin with the same sound or onset.

blend the joining of the sounds of two or more letters with little change in those sounds, for example /spr/ in spring. Also called consonant blend or consonant cluster.

blending to combine the sounds represented by letters to sound out or pronounce a word. Oral blending involves listening and combining sounds to make words. Blending in many popular reading programs involves looking at actual letters and combining the sounds represented by letters to pronounce a word.

chunks parts of a whole word roughly equivalent to an onset and rime or a syllable.

decoding by analogy dividing an unknown word into chunks or parts, and attending to rimes or patterns; using knowledge of known words with identical spelling patterns, to decode these chunks. Putting these sounds together provides the whole word. This process is more reliable than letter-by-letter decoding, and it eliminates the need for blending each sound. Decoding by analogy is what makes onset and rime useful to readers; first described by Patricia Cunningham (1975-76).

digraph two letters that represent one speech sound, for example /sh/, /th/, or /ch/.

onset any consonants before a vowel in a syllable. In the word church, the onset is ch.

onsets and rimes intersyllabic units that are smaller than words and syllables but larger than phonemes. An onset is the portion of a syllable that precedes the vowel. A rime is the portion of the syllable including the vowel(s) and any consonant(s) that follow. In the word church, the onset is ch, and the rime is urch.

Many reading specialists feel that rimes are consistent and reliable, than vowel sounds and rules, and that attention to onsets and rimes provides children with more reliable phonetic cues. Research has also shown that most children recognize onsets and rimes before individual phonemes.

oral blending the ability to fuse discrete phonemes into recognizable words; oral blending puts sounds together to make a word; see also segmentation.

orthography correct or standardized spelling according to established usage in a language.

pattern a regular arrangement of sounds, objects, numbers, shapes or letters. A common link between phonics and numbers is the importance of patterns.

Recognizing patterns is a key to success in mathematics, reading, and writing. (The songs in this recording present many activities to reinforce this key concept.)

Individual letters, especially vowels, make different sounds depending on the syllables they are embedded in. Familiarity with common spelling patterns enhances facility in reading and writing. Recognizing number patterns facilitates children's ability to make generalizations about number combinations, counting strategies, and problem solving.

phoneme the smallest sound unit of speech, for example, the /k/ in book. The word smiles consists of five phonemes /s/, /m/, /i/, /l/, and /z/.

phonemic awareness the ability to recognize that spoken words are made up of discrete sounds and that those sounds can be manipulated.

phonics a way of teaching reading that addresses sound/symbol relationships, especially in beginning instruction.

phonograms letters that represent rimes with more than one phoneme; also called word families.

phonological awareness – Familiarity with the written symbols (alphabet) and the sounds (phonemes) of a language. The ability to connect the symbols with the sounds.

rime a vowel and any following consonants of a syllable. not all syllables or words have onsets, but they all have a rime. For example, the word or syllable it is a rime without an onset. Other examples: out, or

segmentation the ability to break words into individual sounds; see also oral blending.

syllable a minimal unit of sequential speech sounds comprised of a vowel sound or a vowel sound combination.

word families letters that represent rimes with more than one phoneme; also called phonograms.

All songs published by Hap-Pal Music. ©Hap-Pal Music all rights reserved. No part of these lyrics or activities may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without permission from the publisher.

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