Two Little Sounds
Fun with Phonics and Numbers

Introduction

TEACHING HINTS


Visual Aids
Learning is greatly enhanced when visual aids are presented with the recording. Lyrics, key letters, spelling patterns, and words can be presented on charts, cards, chalkboard or felt board. It is also helpful for the teacher to speak the phonemes and words with the recording so children can receive visual cues from the movement of the teacher's lips.

Lead-up Activities
Before presenting a song, read through the lyrics and pick out any words that might be unfamiliar to children. You can also familiarize children with any sounds, letters, or numbers featured in
the lyrics of the song. For example, in preparation for using the song MY RAMBLING CAT (# ), place the letters 'at' on the board. Have children think of all the words they can make with this word ending. Circle the words that will be used in the song.

Follow-up Activities

After children have learned a song, you can further explore the concepts that were introduced. You can ask questions that encourage children to discover new ways of
thinking and moving,
and to create their own song lyrics. Some suggested questions are included in this
teaching guide.

Vocalization of Phonemes
When speaking or singing isolated consonant phonemes, emphasize the initial wind
sound and minimize the "uh" vowel sound that follows. However, recognize that when vocalizing an isolated consonant phoneme some vowel sound will be included. It is
not possible to break a word into discrete phonemes and vocalize each separate sound in isolation. The sounds of each letter affect those that come before and after. It is doubly
impossible to sing a consonant phoneme in isolation. The vibration of the vocal cords,
essential to singing, must settle on some vowel sound, however briefly it may be voiced. That being said, it is still very important for teachers and children to vocalize the individual phonemes. Phonemic segmentation skills appear to be strongly related to decoding abilities in reading.

Developmental Level Of Children - You can adapt the activities suggested in this guide to different age levels. For example, 3-year-olds can experience HICKORY, DICKORY, DOCK as an entertaining musical story which they might sing along with after a few hearings. (You may want to present just a few verses to start with, and gradually add verses as children become familiar with the material.) Teachers of older children can write the words "ickory, ickory, ock" on the board and add different initial consonants, encouraging children to read and sing along with the recording.

Using the pause button on a CD or cassette player adds extra response time when needed. For example, if children need more time to react and come to a complete stop with the WIGGY WIGGLES FREEZE DANCE, the teacher can extend the freeze time by briefly pressing the pause button. With the song TEN MONKEYS IN A TREE, teachers of younger children may want to pause the recording after each verse, and let the children count the number of monkeys remaining. A few of the songs, such as THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE GETS A LITTLE KOOKY are designed primarily for older children
(ages 6 -9).

Instrumental Selections Many of the songs on this recording are repeated as instrumentals with no vocals. Once children have learned a song with the vocal version, they can sing along with the instrumental version. They can also create and sing their own lyrics. Instrumental selections can also be used to accompany movement exploration, creative movement, and activities with rhythm instruments. In short, there are endless possibilities for using the instrumental versions.

NOTES TO THIS TEACHING GUIDE

"Teacher" refers to a teacher, parent, grandparent, guardian, or any other person guiding the child to active involvement with music and movement.

Letters used to represent letter symbols are placed between two apostrophes. Letters used to represent a sound or phoneme are placed between two slanted lines. For example, 'B' refers to the symbol for the second letter of the alphabet, and /b/
refers to the sound made by this letter.

This teaching guide contains the following information:
Subjects lists key letters, numbers, spelling patterns, skills, and concepts introduced in each song.

Vocabulary defines words that may be unfamiliar to children. (In some cases, definitions are included in parenthesis). You can introduce these words before playing a song. You may also want to read through the lyrics and choose other words to explain.

Activity suggests how teachers can introduce and explain activities before the children participate with the recording. Notes or comments addressed directly to the teacher are enclosed in brackets [ ] or identified as "note to teacher."

Lyrics enables teachers to introduce vocabulary and ideas that may be new to children. The words to a song may also be enlarged or printed on a large poster board. This will help children read and sing along with the recording.
Variation is occasionally included to show other ways of actively participating with the recording or ways of adapting the songs for children of different developmental levels.

Follow-up describes activities that can be used after children have participated with the recording. Specific suggestions for using instrumental versions are also presented. estions for using instrumental versions are also presented.

Click Title for Lyrics:
1. Two Little Sounds
2. My Ramblin' Cat
3. Down By The Bay
4. The One That Doesn't Rhyme
5. Wiggy Wiggles Freeze Dance
6. Ten Monkeys In A Tree
7. Meet My Travelin' Friends
8. We Discover Number Patterns
9. Apples, Bananas, Peaches And
    Tomatoes

10. My Playful Pig
11. How Many Are Here?
       And Subtraction)
12. Hickory, Dickory, Dock
13. The English Language Gets A
       Little Kooky
- Consonants
14. Five Pennies Make A Nickel

15. Tall Tremendous Tens And
       Wee Wonderful Ones

16. What Are You Wearing?


17. The English Language Gets
       A Little Kooky
- Vowels
18. Good-bye, So Long, Farewell,
       Toodle-oo

19. Two Little Sounds - Instrumental
20. Down by the Bay - Instrumental
21. The One That Doesn't Rhyme -
       Instrumental
22. Wiggy Wiggles Freeze Dance -
       Instrumental
23. Ten Monkeys In A Tree -
       Instrumental
24. Meet My Travelin' Friends -
       Instrumental
25. Five Pennies Make A Nickel -
       Instrumental
26. Tall Tremendous Tens And Wee
       Wonderful Ones - Instrumental
27. Good-bye, So Long, Farewell,
       Toodle-oo - Instrumental

1. Two Little Sounds
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Beginning and ending consonant sounds Initial consonants: C, W, CH, P, M Ending consonants: D, N, P, and K with a silent E

Vocabulary:
cornbread, watermelon, chicken soup, popcorn, milkshake.

Activity:
In this song, you'll hear the names of different foods, with the beginning and ending sounds removed. The challenge is to find the missing sounds and name the food.
If you can guess the food, first say the word, stretching out the beginning and ending
sounds; next, call out the name of the food before you hear the answer on the recording.

Lyrics:
Here's a funny word that you've prob'ly never heard
It's something for your tummy and it's really, really yummy
Two little sounds and it's complete. Let's get ready to eat

Ornbrea, ornbrea, who wants some fresh baked ornbrea?
Two little sounds and it's complete. Let's get ready to eat
(spoken) /c/ ... ornbrea .../d/ .... cornbread!

Atermelo, atermelo, who wants a slice of atermelo?
Two little sounds and it's complete. Let's get ready to eat
(spoken) /w/ ... atermelo .../n/ .... watermelon!

Two little sounds that's right my friend One at the start and one at the end Two little sounds that we include For naming each familiar food

Ickensou, ickensou, who wants a bowl of ickensou?
Two little sounds and it's complete. Let's get ready to eat
(spoken) /ch/ ... icken sou .../p/ .... chicken soup!

Opcor, opcor, who wants a bag of opcor?
Two little sounds and it's complete. Let's get ready to eat
(spoken) /p/ ... opcor .../n/ .... popcorn!
Two little sounds that's right my friend One at the start and one at the end Two little sounds that we include For naming each familiar food

Ilksha, ilksha, who wants a frosty ilksha?
Two little sounds and it's complete. Let's get ready to eat
(spoken) /m/ ... ilksha .../ke/ .... milkshake!

Yummy, yum, yum, yes indeed Two little sounds is all we need

Follow-up:
What are your favorite foods? List foods by categories: fruits, vegetables, bread
and cereal, dairy, meats, etc. Remove the first and last sound of some of these foods.
Can you say the funny word that remains? Pick 5 foods and sing the song again with the instrumental version (# ) using your choices. Here are some examples:

umpki
anca
eanut butt
antalou
uacamol
Who wants a slice of umpki pie (pumpkin pie)
Who wants a moon-shaped anca (pancake)
Who wants some bread and eanut butt (peanut butter)
Who wants some juicy antalou (cantaloupe)
Who wants chips and uacamol (guacamole)

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2. My Ramblin' Cat
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
'At' word family Letter sounds C, R, H, S, B, T, and SC blend

Vocabulary:
cat, rat, hat, sat, bat, tat-a-tat, pat scat: (jazz singing with nonsense syllables)

Teacher Note:
As an introduction, you can place the letters 'at' on board. Have the children think of
all the words they can make with this word ending. Circle the words that will be used in this song.

Activity:
Let's start with the word 'cat.' In each verse, we will drop the first letter and
replace it with another. During the pause, the challenge is to call out the new word
before you hear it on the recording. You can also act out this story in movement.
Motions you can do in a seated or standing position are suggested in italics with the
lyrics below.

Lyrics:
C-A-T, my ramblin' cat, drop the 'C' and use an 'R'
My cat ran off and chased a rat pat legs quickly
R-A-T, chased rat, drop the 'R' and use an 'H'
While chasin' my cat I lost my hat
pump arms, tap feet pantomime hat flying off

H-A-T, lost my hat, drop the 'H' and use an 'S'
I slumped on a bench and there I sat slump in seat with sad face
S-A-T, there I sat, drop the 'S' and use a 'B'
I saw some friends with a ball and bat sit up tall with happy face
B-A-T, I swung that bat: pantomime-swinging bat
Strike 1 . . . strike 2 . . . home run!
B-A-T, I swung that bat, drop the 'B' and use a 'T'
The ball hit a trash can tat-a-tat-tat slap sides of legs quickly

T-A-T, tat-a-tat-tat, drop the 'T' and use 'S' 'C'
My cat jumped out singing scat
repeat or echo each phrase Shooby doo, Shooby doo
Doo dah dat, Doo dah dat
Meeow wow wow, Meeow wow wow
Pitter pat pat, Pitter pat pat
Purrrrrr, Purrrrrr
Shooby doo bop doo dah dat, Shooby doo bop doo dah dat
My ramblin' cat can scat like that, My Ramblin' cat can scat like that
Meeeooow, Meeeooow

Follow-up:
Name all the words you can recall from this song that use the ending 'at'. Can you think of words that end with 'at' that were not used in this song? Examples: flat, chat, fat, mat, gnat, vat

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3. Down By The Bay
Traditional, Additional Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Rhyming Words Word families: uba, et, um, one, ute, in, al, ello, orn, oe, et, arp, oon, ace Instruments of the orchestra

Vocabulary:
orchestra, tuba, trumpet, drum, trombone, flute, violin, cymbal, cello,
French horn, oboe, clarinet, harp, viola, bassoon, bass.

Activity:
Sing along with this call-and-response favorite and pantomime playing the
instruments as they are named.

Lyrics:
Down by the bay, where the watermelons grow
Back to this place I dare not go
For if I do, my mother will say
Did you ever see a tuba swimming off to Cuba?
Down by the bay

Down by the bay, where the watermelons grow
Back to this place I dare not go
For if I do, my mother will say
Did you ever see a trumpet munching on a crumpet?
Down by the bay

Did you ever see a drum chewing bubble-gum?
Did you ever see a trombone gnawing on a dog's bone?
Did you ever see a flute shake a parachute?
Did you see a violin kiss a monkey on the chin?

Down by the bay, where the watermelons grow
Back to this place I dare not go
For if I do, my mother will say
Did you ever see a cymbal sipping from a thimble?
Down by the bay

Did you ever see a cello eat a bowl of Jello?
Did you ever see a French horn munch a bag of pop corn?
Did you ever see an oboe dancing with a hobo?
Did you see a clarinet take a kitten to the vet?

Did you ever see a harp playing checkers with a carp?
Did you see a viola eating some granola?
Did you see a bassoon talking to the moon?
Did you ever see a bass race a rocket into space?

Down by the bay, where the watermelons grow
Back to this place I dare not go
For if I do my mother will say
Let the orchestra play 'til the break of day
Down by the bay (Whole orchestra plays)

Follow-up:
Listen to the instrumental version of this song (# ) and call out the name of
instruments you can recognize by sound. Can you think of instruments that were not
named in this song? Examples: guitar, saxophone, piano, piccolo.

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4. The One That Doesn't Rhyme
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Same and different
Word families: ink, ell, ig, ack, ip, in
Rhyming words
Basic motor skills

Vocabulary:
same, different, rhyme, shake, bounce, reach, twirl, twist, sway

Activity:
In the verses of this song, you will hear groups of 4 words. Say or sing each word.
Notice that 3 words rhyme, and one word does not rhyme. Each word that does not rhyme describes a motion. Show you recognize the word by doing the motion.

Lyrics:
Four things we will name, one is not the same
We do the one that's different, that's our little game
Every time, we do the one that doesn't rhyme
BLINK WINK SHAKE CLINK
SELL BOUNCE TELL YELL
Every time, we do the one that doesn't rhyme
JIG REACH DIG RIG
PACK YACK TWIRL CLACK
Every time, we do the one that doesn't rhyme
DIP SIP TWIST TIP
SWAY SPIN PIN WIN
Every time, we do the one that doesn't rhyme

Follow-up:
All the words in this song are verbs. They describe actions, something you can do.
Which of the words could also be used as nouns?
Examples: SHAKE, PACK, RIG, DIP, PIN. Can you make up sentences that use these words as nouns?
Make your own lists of 3 verbs that rhyme and one verb that does not rhyme. For example:

CLING SING HOP FLING
JUMP HUG TUG SHRUG

Using the instrumental version (# ), sing this song using your ideas.

You can also use the instrumental version to play "photo freeze." Imagine a photographer is taking pictures of you as you make a different pose with each quick pause in the music.

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5. Wiggy Wiggles Freeze-Dance
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Note: This arrangement of one of Hap's earlier songs, WIGGY WIGGY WIGGLES,* includes more pauses to allow time for the teacher to point out initial
consonant sounds and word families. It also gives children more opportunities
to develop self-control as they react to auditory cues and alternate between
action and stillness.

Subjects:
Initial consonant sounds: W, B, J, F, G, Blends: SQ, SH
Word families: iggy, illy, idge, olly, uzzie, eep

Vocabulary:
Wiggle, jiggle, squirm, shiver, fidget, freeze, slow down, calm down.

Teacher Note: As a lead-up activity, you can read through the words line by line.
After each line, point out the words that begin with the same sound, For example:
I got the wiggy wiggy wiggles . . . /w/ wiggy, wiggles
The squizzy squizzy squirmies . . . /sq/ squizzy. squirmies
The busy, busy, buzzies like a buzzing fly . . . /b/ busy, buzzing
Here are 4 levels which suggest how you can structure this lead-up to the developmental
level of the children/child you are working with.
1. Simply say the words that begin with the same sound.
2. Ask, "What letter makes this sound?"
3. Without pointing out anything, read a line and ask, "What letter
sound did you hear more than once?"
5. Point out word families such as the "ig" in wiggy or the "iz" in
squizzy.

Activity:
When you hear the music, wiggle around. When the music stops, freeze!

Lyrics:
I got the wiggy wiggy wiggles and I can't slow down
The squizzy squizzy squirmies, got to move around
The busy, busy, buzzies like a buzzing fly
The silly willy nillies and I don't know why (Freeze)

I got the jiggy jiggy jiggles and I can't sit still
The shiver shiver shakies like a fever chill
The fidgy fidgy fidgets and I'm flippin' out
Golly golly jeepers got to jump about (Freeze)

And my mommy and my daddy and my teachers say
"Calm down, cool down, hey, hey, hey!
You drive us crazy crackers when you act this way
Slow down, slow down, slow down, slow down
I got the wiggy wiggy wiggles and I can't slow down
The squizzy squizzy squirmies, got to move around (Freeze)
The busy, busy, buzzies like a buzzing fly
The silly willy nillies and I don't know why

I got the jiggy jiggy jiggles and I can't sit still (Freeze)
The shiver shiver shakies like a fever chill (Freeze)
The fidgy fidgy fidgets and I'm flippin' out
Golly golly jeepers got to, golly golly jeepers got to
Golly golly jeepers got to jump about (Freeze)

Variation:

During the silences while the children are freezing, the teacher can whisper the
initial consonant sounds and internal word families in the preceding words. If necessary, teachers of younger children can use the pause button to extend the freeze time to allow children time to come to a complete stop.

Follow-up:
Write out the words on a chart. Have the children read along as they speak
or sing the words. Point out and emphasize the similar initial consonant sounds and/or word families in each line. After children have learned the song, have them sing along with the instrumental version (# ) of this song.

*Original version from the recording SALLY THE SWINGING SNAKE

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6. Ten Monkeys In A Tree
Variation on Traditional Chant, Music and Additional Words: Hap Palmer

Note: This is a variation of the traditional chant "Five Monkeys in a Tree."
An original melody, and additional lyrics emphasize number patterns
and more complex subtraction facts.

Subjects:
Subtraction: 10-1, 9-2, 7-3, 4-4
Number patterns
Ordinal numbers: first, second, third, fourth

Vocabulary:
monkey, crocodile, tease, snap,

Activity:
This is a story about 10 monkeys swinging in a tree and teasing a crocodile as it
passes by in the river below. The first time the crocodile passes by, it snaps one time.
The second time the crocodile passes by, it snaps 2 times. The third time the crocodile
passes by, it snaps 3 times. How many times do you think the crocodile snaps the fourth
time it passes by?

Here are some hand motions you can do with this song:
Ten little monkeys swinging in a tree Hold up 10 fingers
Teasing Mister Crocodile, "Can't catch me" Wiggle 10 fingers
Along comes Mister Crocodile . . . Arms together weaving in side-to-side motion
And snap! one little monkey is missing from the tree! Hands snap together
Nine little monkeys swinging in a tree Hold up 9 fingers and continue as above

After each verse, call out the number of monkeys remaining.

Lyrics:
Ten little monkeys swinging in a tree
Teasing Mister Crocodile, "Can't catch me"
Along comes Mister Crocodile, quiet as can be
And snap! One little monkey is missing from the tree

Nine little monkeys swinging in a tree
Teasing Mister Crocodile, "Can't catch me"
Along comes Mister Crocodile, quiet as can be
And snap, snap! Two more monkeys are missing from the tree

Seven little monkeys swinging in a tree
Teasing Mister Crocodile, "Can't catch me"
Along comes Mister Crocodile quiet as can be
And snap, snap, snap! Three more monkeys are missing from the tree

Four little monkeys swinging in a tree
Teasing Mister Crocodile, "Can't catch me"
Along comes Mister Crocodile, quiet as can be
And snap, snap, snap, snap! Four more monkeys are missing from the tree

No little monkeys swinging in a tree
Teasing Mister Crocodile, "Can't catch me"
Along comes Mister Crocodile, swimming right by the tree
Where surprise, surprise, I can't believe my eyes,
Ten little monkeys are hiding in the leaves, 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
They said, "Shh, Shh . . . Let's not tease that Crocodile again!

Variation:
Use the pause button to adapt this song to the developmental level of younger children.
Stop the recording after each verse, and let the children count the number of monkeys
remaining.

Follow-up:
What lesson did the monkeys learn? Why is it not a good idea to tease?
From a seated position, use your arms and hands to explore 3 different qualities of
movement:
1. bouncy and playful
2. slow, smooth and quiet
3. sudden and quick
In an open area, explore these motions using your whole body.
Listen to the instrumental version of this song ( ) and match the 3 movement qualities
with the mood and feeling of the music.

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7. Meet My Travelin' Friends
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Alliteration - repetition of same initial letter sound
Location and names of various cities and countries

Vocabulary:

San Francisco, Amsterdam, New Orleans, Guatemala,
Kazakhstan, Paris, Jacksonville, Tokyo, Zanzibar, Yakima, London, Omaha,
Walla Walla, Honolulu, Queensland, Venezuela, Rosarito, Mozambique
vacation, destination, transportation.

Activity:
Let's hear the names of some people and the places they went.
After each set of 3 names, sing "Come meet my travelin' friends." (Play recording).
Do you notice anything unusual about the names of the people and the places they went?
(Answer: the names of the
people and the places they went start with the same letter.) Can you think of a place
you would like to go that begins with the same letter as your name?
[Write on the board the names and places suggested by the children. Using the
instrumental version, (# ) sing the song again using the children's ideas.]

Lyrics:
Sarah went to San Francisco
Amber went to Amsterdam
Neville went to New Orleans
Come meet my traveling friends

Galen went to Guatemala
Kayla went to Kazakhstan
Paco went to Paris
Come meet my travelin' friends

They rode some kind of transportation
Took them to their destination,
They all had a nice vacation,
Where did they go? Wouldn't you like to know?

Jackie went to Jacksonville
Tony went to Tokyo
Zuri went to Zanzibar
Come meet my travelin' friends

Yoshi went to Yakima,
Ling went to London,
Olga went to Omaha
Come meet my travelin' friends

Repeat verse 3

Walter went to Walla Walla
Hadya went to Honolulu
Quentin went to Queensland
Come meet my travelin' friends
Vasu went to Venezuela
Raj went to Roswell
Mina went to Mozambique
Come meet my traveling friends

They're walkin' and ridin', floatin' and flyin', all around the world

Variation:
When children return from summer vacation or winter break, use this
activity during sharing time. Start by asking the following questions:] Did you go anywhere
during our school vacation break? It can be any place: somewhere in your neighborhood,
another city, state, or country. Let's write on the board each person's name and the place
each person went. Have the class sing the children's names and the places they went with
the instrumental version (# ) of this song.

Follow-up:
What country do we live in?...What state?...What city?
Where do your parents or grandparents come from? Let's find these places on a map or globe.

Use alliteration and create a line using your own name. Can you find a verb that starts with the same sound as your name and the place you go?
Examples:
Claralyse clapped in Clarksville
Raymond ran to Riverside
Flora flew to Florence

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8. We Discover Number Patterns
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Number patterns
"Skip counting" or counting by twos,
Counting by odd numbers
Counting backwards
Word families: 'ap', 'oo', and 'ump'
Initial consonant sounds: SN, SL, T, CL, SH, C, WH, M, TH, P, J, B
Recognizing rhythmic pulse

Vocabulary:

Pattern, snap, slap, tap, clap, fly, shoo, dove, coo, owl, whoo, cow, moo,
drum, thump, pump, bunny, jump, zero

Teacher Note: As a lead-up activity, you can place the word endings 'ap' 'oo'
and 'ump' on the board and have children think of all the words they can make with each word ending. Circle the words that will be used in the song. You can also write the numbers 2, 4, 6, on the board. Have children call out the number that comes next in this pattern. Repeat the process with the numbers 1, 3, 5, and 3, 2, 1.

Activity:
In the first verse, you will make sounds that end with 'ap'. The song will tell
how many times to snap your fingers, slap your knees, and tap your foot. Next, the song will ask how many times you clap your hands. If you see the pattern in the series of numbers, call out the answer, and then clap your hands the correct number of times. In the verses that follow, you will discover other number patterns and use your voice to make sounds that end with 'oo' and sounds that end with 'ump.'

Lyrics:
We discover number patterns using words that end with 'ap'
You can help predict what's next, just put on your thinking cap
We discover number patterns using words that end with 'ap'
Like snap, slap, tap, and clap

Snap your fingers 2 times snap, snap
Slap your knees 4 times slap, slap, slap, slap
Tap your foot 6 times tap, tap, tap, tap, tap, tap, 2, 4, 6
How many times do you clap your hands?...Eight !
clap, clap, clap, clap, clap, clap, clap, clap,

We discover number patterns using words that end with 'oo'
Counting every sound, soon we'll know and so will you
We discover number patterns using words that end with 'oo'
Like shoo, coo, whoo, and moo

Shoo the flies 1 time shoo
Hear the dove coo 3 times coo, coo, coo
Hear the owl whoo 5 times whoo, whoo, whoo, whoo, whoo 1, 3, 5
How many times does the cow moo?...Seven !
moo, moo, moo, moo, moo, moo, moo

We discover number patterns using words that end with 'ump'
Counting every sound, we're mighty hard to stump
We discover number patterns using words that end with 'ump'
Like thump, pump, jump, and bump

Hear the drum thump three times, thump, thump, thump
Hear the pump pump two times, psssht, psssht,
Hear the bunny jump one time, boing! 3, 2, 1
How many times do the cars bump?...
(sound of cars accelerating and brakes screeching)
Phew! I'm glad the next number was zero!


Follow-up:
Let's review some of the number patterns used in this song:
2, 4, 6, 8...What comes next? 1, 3, 5, 7...What comes next?

(For older children) Say the number that comes next in each of these patterns:
1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32...Can you describe the pattern? (double the number)
1, 3, 2, 4, 3, 5, 4, 6...Can you describe the pattern? (two forward, one back)
Can you create your own number pattern?

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9. Apples, Bananas, Peaches, And Tomatoes
Traditional, Additional Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Note: This variation of the traditional favorite, "Apples and Bananas."
features both long and short vowel sounds.

Subject:
Long and short vowel sounds

Vocabulary:
Apple, banana, peach, tomato, long and short vowels, stretch, long, shrink, short.

Activity:
Start by singing, "I like to eat, eat, eat, apples and bananas." Then listen for a new
vowel sound. Keep changing the vowel sounds in the words "eat" "apples" and "bananas" to match the vowel sound sung before each line. After singing the first verse, take a break by stretching with the long vowel sounds, and shrinking with the short vowel sounds. Next, sing the song again using the short vowel sounds with the words eat, peaches, and tomatoes.

Lyrics:
I like to eat, eat, eat, apples and bananas
A...I like to ate, ate, ate, aypuls and baynaynays
E...I like to eet, eet, eet, eeples and beeneenees
I...I like to ite, ite, ite, iples and bininis
O...I like to ote, ote, ote, oples and bononos
U...I like to yute, yute, yute, yuples and bununus

My stomach's getting stuffed, I guess I've had enough
I'll stretch long with the long vowel sounds, aye, eee, iye, oh, you
And I'll shrink with the short vowel sounds, ah, eh, ih, aw, uh
Down, down, down, to the floor...ah...
I'm ready to eat some more!

I like to eat, eat, eat, peaches and tomatoes
Aah...I like to at, at, at, paches and tamatas
Eh...I like to et, et, et, peches and temetes
Ih...I like to it, it, it, piches and timitis
Aw...I like to ot, ot, ot, poches and tomotos
Uh...I like to ut, ut, ut, puches and tumutus

My stomach's getting stuffed, now I know I've had enough
I'll stretch long with the long vowel sounds, aye, eee, iye, oh, you
And I'll shrink with the short vowel sounds, aah, eh, ih, aw, uh
And I'm dan, den, din, don, done
I've got to ran, ren, rin, ron, run!

Follow-up:

Switch the vowel sounds and sing "apples and bananas" using short vowel sounds, and "peaches and tomatoes" using long vowel sounds. Think of other vegetables and fruits that were not named in this song. For example: potatoes, papayas, cherries, broccoli, asparagus, carrots, cabbage. Try changing the vowel sounds on a variety of foods and sing this song again using foods you have selected.

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10. My Playful Pig
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Initial consonant sounds: P, W, J, F, B Blend: TW
Ending consonant sound: S
Word Family: 'ig'

Vocabulary:
Pig, wig, jig, twig, fig, figs, big

Teacher Note:
As a lead up activity, you can place the letters 'IG' on board. Have children
think of all the words they can make with this word ending. Circle the words that will be used
in this song.

Activity:
Let's start with the letters 'ig'. If I put the letter 'P' in front of 'ig' what does it spell?
In each verse, we will drop the first letter and replace it with another. The challenge is to call
out the new word. You can also act out the playful things the pig does. The song ends with a
call-and-response sing-along that reviews all the 'ig' family words we used in this story.
[The teacher can write each 'ig' word on the board so children get both visual and auditory cues
to help them read each word.]

Lyrics:
Pig, pig, my playful pig, drop that 'P' and use a 'W'
With a clump of weeds, he wove a wig

Wig, wig, wove a wig, drop that 'W', use a 'J'
In his funny wig, he danced a jig
Oooo- jiggley-jig

Jig, jig, danced a jig, drop the 'J' and use 'TW'
While dancin' a jig, he tripped on a twig

Twig, twig, tripped on a twig, drop 'TW,' use an 'F'
He fell in the mud and squished a fig
Oooo- figgley-fig

Fig, fig, squished a fig, add an 'S' at the end of fig
He climbed a tree and picked 3 figs

Figs, figs, drop the 'F', drop 'S', start with 'B'
He juggled those figs and the crowd got big

The people cheered and the crowd got big
Together they chanted, Go pig go!
The people cheered and the crowd got big
Together they chanted, Go pig go!

piggle-ly-pig, piggle-ly-pig, wiggle-ly-wig, wiggle-ly-wig,
jiggle-ly-jig, jiggle-ly-jig, twiggle-ly-twig, twiggle-ly-twig,
figgle-ly-fig, figgle-ly-fig, biggle-ly-big, biggle-ly-big
Hey diddle diddle, dance with a fiddle
Hey diddle diddle, dance with a fiddle
Then wiggle in the mud with my playful pig
Then wiggle in the mud with my playful pig

Variation:
For an extra challenge, use only auditory cues, and mentally visualize the word 'pig'.
Listen to the song, and in your mind, replace the 'p' with the letters suggested in each verse.
Call out each new 'ig' word during the instrumental section between verses.
This is a great way to use this song if you are listening while riding in the car.

Follow-up:
Play this fill-in-the-blanks memory game: My playful ___
wove a ___ danced a ___ tripped on a ___ squished a ___
picked 3 ___ juggled three ___ and the crowd got ___
Together they chanted ___ ___ ___ .

Recite the following poem:
My playful pig wove a wig,
Danced a jig, tripped on a twig,
Squished a fig, picked 3 figs,
Juggled those figs and the crowd got big.

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11. How Many Are Here? (Addition and Subtraction)
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Addition and subtraction of facts to 10
Coordination of hands and fingers

Vocabulary:
add, subtract, sum, plus, minus

Activity:
In this song we hold up fingers to represent groups of people.

For Example:

A merry group of 3
Met a merry group of 3
They got together to sing and play
They said, "How many are here today?
A merry group of 6
Sang and played all day
Then 3 waved danced away
How many were left to sing and play?

Hold up 3 fingers on one hand.
Hold up 3 fingers on the other hand.
Bring hands and fingers together.
Call out total number of fingers.
Hold up 3 fingers on each hand.
Wiggle fingers and move hands.
3 fingers wave and dance away.
Call out number of fingers remaining.

Let your fingers play and dance with the music. Solve each addition and subtraction problem,
and try to call out the answer before you hear it on the recording.

Lyrics:
Oh, a merry group of 3 met a merry group of 3
They got together to sing and play
They said, "How many are here today? . . . 3 plus 3 is 6
Oh, a merry group of 6 sang and played all day
Then 3 waved and danced away
How many were left to sing and play? . . . 6 minus 3 is 3

A friendly group of 3 met a friendly group of 4
They said, "Let's get together and we'll have so many more"
Someone find the sum and say how many we have today
We're a jolly group, a traveling troop of 3 plus 4 is 7

Oh, a merry group of 7 sang and played all day
Then 4 waved and danced away
How many were left to sing and play? . . . 7 minus 4 is 3

A friendly group of 5 met another group of 5
They said, "Let's have a party now that everyone's arrived."
Someone find the sum and say how many we have today
We're a jolly group, a traveling troop of 5 plus 5 is 10

Oh, a merry group of 10 sang and played all day
Then 5 waved and danced away
How many were left to sing and play? 10 minus 5 is 5
Then everyone danced away, none remained to sing and play
Zero friends were left to say, "How many are here today?"

Follow-up:
Try the addition-only version of this song (#11) from the recording
ONE LITTLE SOUND. Make up your own addition and subtraction
problems and sing them with the instrumental version of this
song (# 23) from the recording ONE LITTLE SOUND.

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12. Hickory, Dickory, Dock
Traditional, Additional Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Initial consonants: H, D, R, W, B, T, P, G
Blends: CR, SN, SQ
Numbers 1 - 12
Telling time on the hour
Word families: ick, ock

Vocabulary:
mouse, rat, worm, cricket, bee, snake, squirrel, toad, poodle, gorilla

Activity:
How would you say the words hickory, dickory, dock if you took off the beginning
sound for each of the words? Let's all say it together, "ickory, ickory, ock."
What letter does the word "rat" begin with? What would it sound like if we
put the 'r' sound in front of the words ickory, ickory, ock?
Let's all say it together, "rickory, rickory, rock."
Now let's sing this variation of the familiar favorite, "Hickory, Dickory, Dock."
We'll start with the traditional first verse.
Each verse that follows features a different animal.

Lyrics:
Hickory, dickory, dock
The mouse ran up the clock,
The clock struck one, the mouse ran down
Hickory, dickory, dock
Then a rat came by, said, "Rickory rock
Make room for me and I'll run up the clock!"
Rickory, rickory, rock,
The rat ran up the clock,
The clock struck two, the rat said, "boo!"
Rickory, rickory, rock

Then a worm came by, said, "Wickory wock
Make room for me and I'll wiggle up the clock!"
Wickory, wickory, wock
The worm wiggled up the clock,
The clock struck three, the worm said, "whee!"
Wickory, wickory, wock

Then a cricket came by, said, "Crickory, crock
Let me come along and I'll sing you a song"

Crickory, crickory, crock
The cricket crawled up the clock,
The clock struck four, the cricket sang, more, more, more, more
Crickory, crickory, crock

At five o'clock a bee buzzed up, bickory, bickory, bock,
At six o'clock a snake slithered up, snickory, snickory, snock
At seven o'clock a squirrel squirmed up, squickory, squickory, squock
At eight o'clock a toad trudged up, tickory, tickory, tock
At nine o'clock a poodle pranced up, pickory, pickory, pock
At ten o'clock, gorilla awoke and roared, "Too much noise !"

Gickory, gickory, gock, gorilla grabbed the clock
The clock struck ten, gorilla growled, "The end!"
Gickory, gickory, gock

Gorilla crawled back in his bed and he began to snore
And little mouse snuck right by "shhh" and climbed the clock once more

Hickory, dickory, dock
The mouse ran up the clock,
The clock struck eleven, the mouse said, "Good heavens! - It's late"
Hickory, dickory, dock
At twelve o'clock, everyone was asleep

Variation:
You can also hold up a clock, and set the hands to say the time named in each verse.

Follow-up:
Name all the animals you can remember from this song.
Name some animals that were not in this song. Try chanting this rhyme using the
names of different animals.
Examples:
Lion: lickory, lickory, lock
Jaguar: jickory, jickory, jock
Cheetah: chickory, chickory, chock
Yak: yickory, yickory, yock

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13. The English Language Gets A Little Kooky (Consonants)
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Different ways to spell the same sound.
Different spellings for consonant sounds: J, S, K, and SH.
Changes in mood and tempo of music.

Teacher Note: This song shows that letters are symbols for sounds and that there is often more than one way to spell the same sound. Each verse features a consonant sound.
Bold letters within the example words show different ways the featured sound is spelled.
Place each example word on the board or on a word chart. For example, in the
first verse, display the following words: jelly jam ginger giraffe page cage fudge gee
jolly genius judged logic.
This song is appropriate for children in grades 1-3.

Activity:
Look at the words on the board. Call out each word I touch with the pointer.
When the music suddenly speeds up, jump up and create a kooky dance.
When the music slows down, sit back down and get ready to read more words.

Lyric:
'J' makes the /j/ sound in jelly and jam
But 'G' says /j/ in ginger and giraffe
'G-E' says /j/ in page, and cage
And 'D-G-E' says /j/ in fudge
Gee, what jolly genius judged the logic of this?? Oh,

Chorus: The English language gets a little kooky
Gets a little kooky now and then
The English language gets a little kooky
Now and then, my friend.

'S' makes the /s/ sound in singer and song
But 'C' says /s/ in cereal and city
'S-S says /s/ at the end of glass and kiss
And 'SC' says /s/ at the start of scissors
It's senseless, yes, but just accept this silly song and sing...Oh,

Repeat Chorus

'C' makes a /k/ sound in cat and cow
But 'K' says /k/ in kitten and kazoo
'C' and 'K' together say /k/ in sack and wacky
And 'C-H' says /k/ in chorus and choir. Ah...Oh,

Repeat Chorus

'S-H' says /sh/ in ship and shark
But 'T-I' says /sh/ in motion and potion
'C-E' says /sh/ in ocean, 'C-H' says /sh/ in chef
'C-I' says /sh/ in special, and 'S' says /sh/ in sure
There surely should be fewer ways to show the sound of 'shhh'...Oh,

Repeat Chorus softly

There are many more examples we can't fit them in this song
The rules are sometimes right, and sometimes they are wrong
When spelling makes no sense and you're frustrated and incensed
Take a breath, count to three, 1, 2, 3, and sing this little song...Oh,

Repeat Chorus

Ho, ho, ho, ha, ha, ha, la, la, la, la, la, la, la!

Follow-up:
Let's review some of the ideas covered in this song.
Can you think of three ways to spell the the sound /s/? /k/? /sh/?
Name 2 different sounds you can spell with the letter 'G.' There are many examples not
shown in this song. For example, can you think of two ways to spell the sound /f/?
( 'f' 'gh' 'ph' examples: fish, laugh, philosophy)

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14. Five Pennies Make A Nickel
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Units of money
Ways of getting to 100

Vocabulary:
penny, nickel, dime, quarter, dollar

Activity:
Hold up fingers to show the number of coins named. For example,
in the first verse:
Five pennies make a nickel Hold up 5 fingers, then one finger
Two nickels make a dime Hold up 2 fingers, then one finger
Ten dimes make a dollar Hold up 10 fingers, then one finger
That's a hundred pennies in all Quickly flash 10 fingers 10 times

During the chorus, cup your hands and imagine you hold 100 pennies.
Shake the pennies as you sing. During the last verse, fill in the blanks and
call out the name of the coin that completes each line.

Lyrics:
Five pennies make a nickel
Two nickels make a dime
Ten dimes make a dollar
That's a hundred pennies in all

Chorus:
Jingle, jangle, jing-a-ling, ling
A hundred pennies rattle and ring
If they're heavy, don't you holler,
Just trade 'em for a dollar
'Cause a dollar's worth the very same thing

Five pennies make a nickel
Five nickels make a quarter
Four quarters make a dollar
That's a hundred pennies in all

Repeat Chorus

Five pennies make a _______
Two nickels make a _______
Ten dimes make a _______
That's a hundred pennies in all
Five pennies make a _______
Five nickels make a _______
Four quarters make a _______
That's a hundred pennies in all

Repeat Chorus

Follow-up:
Find other ways to make a dollar. Examples: How many nickels would
you need to make a dollar? If you had 2 quarters, how many dimes would you need
to get to a dollar? If you had 5 dimes, how many quarters would you need?

Call out the number of pennies or cents made by each combination of coins:
3 dimes make _____ (30¢)
2 quarters make _____ (50¢)
4 nickels make _____ (20¢)
That's a hundred pennies in all

1 quarter makes _____ (25¢)
5 nickels make _____ (25¢)
5 dimes make _____ (50¢)
That's a hundred pennies in all

Use the above verses, or find your own ways of combining coins in 3 steps to get to
100 cents, or one dollar. Using your lyrics, sing this song again with the instrumental
version (# ).

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15. Tall Tremendous Tens And Wee Wonderful Ones
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Place Value: tens and ones
Addition and/or multiplication
Word problems

Vocabulary:

Tens, ones, dog, flea, horse, cow, bicycle, tricycle

Activity:
Each verse begins with a problem. Combine the of tens and ones
that march out of Hubert's closet and call out the answer when you hear the
words "the answer is..."
[This activity can involve both thinking and moving.]
After you hear each problem, imagine you are playing a big drum. Pound your
fists and sing "boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom."
Next, in a seated or standing position, march in time with the music.

Lyrics:
Hubert groaned at his homework
As he struggled with problems like these:
If one dog had 10 fleas and one dog had 12 fleas
Please, how many fleas would there be?"
He scratched his head and frowned
When suddenly from his closet came this sound
Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom

Two tall tremendous tens and two wee wonderful ones
Came marching out and circled 'round his room
As they bounced across his bed, lights went on in Hubert's head
In a flash he knew the answer to the quiz
Two tall tremendous tens and two wee wonderful ones, the answer is...22

Then back in the closet they marched and quickly shut the door
Hubert hollered, "Hey, can you help me solve one more?"
"How many legs on 10 cows and 2 horses?"
Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom

Four tall tremendous tens and 8 wee wonderful ones
Came marching out and circled 'round his room
As they bounced across his bed, lights went on in Hubert's head
In a flash he knew the answer to the quiz
Four tall tremendous tens and 8 wee wonderful ones, the answer is...48

Then back in the closet they marched and quickly shut the door
Hubert hollered, "Hey, can you help me solve one more?"
How many wheels on 12 bicycles and 3 tricycles?
Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, boom

Three tall tremendous tens and 3 wee wonderful ones
Came marching out and circled 'round his room
As they bounced across his bed, lights went on in Hubert's head
In a flash he knew the answer to the quiz boom, boom, boom
Three tall tremendous tens and 3 wee wonderful ones, the answer is...33

Now Hubert does his homework every night with tons of fun
With help from tall tremendous tens and wee wonderful ones

Variation:
Challenge older children to figure out or estimate the number of tens
and ones in the answer and sing along with the whole song. If more "think time"
is needed, pause the recording just before the "Boom, boom, boom..." section.

Follow-up:
Make your own problems. Sing this song with the instrumental version (#26 )
using your ideas.
Here is an example:

Verse 1 Hubert groaned at his homework
As he stared at the problem on the page
"Trudy is 20, Tammy is 9
What's their combined age?"

Verse 2 How many legs in 2 tables and 4 chairs?

Verse 3 How many fingers on 5 hands?

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16. What Are You Wearing?
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Note: This variation of one of Hap's earliest songs, emphasizes initial consonant sounds.*

Subjects:
Letter sounds: P, B, S, J, D and Blends: SH, SW, CL
Articles of clothing
Basic motor skills

Vocabulary:
Clothing: shoes, pants, buttons, dress, shirt, sweater, socks.
Actions: shake, pat, shrug, swing, bounce, step, jump, dance, clap.

Teacher Note: With younger children you may want to start with the following sequence
before playing this song:
Ask children to stand if they are wearing a particular item of clothing.
Say the item of clothing and a motion that that starts with the same letter,
emphasizing the initial consonant sound.
- Have children do the motion for 8 counts then sit back down.

For example:
If you are wearing shoes, stand up. Shake your shoes for 3 counts, and then sit down.
If you are wearing pants, stand up. Pat your pants for 3 counts, and then sit down.
If you are wearing a shirt, stand up. Shrug your shoulders for 3 counts, and then sit.

Now, everybody, no matter what you are wearing, stand up and do all 3 motions at the
same time: shake your shoes, pat your pants, and shrug your shoulders.

Activity:
In this song you will hear the name of something you might be wearing and a way
of moving that starts with the same letter sound. For example, "If you're wearing shoes,
shake your shoes." Notice that shoes and shake start with the same sound. After 3 pieces
of clothing have been named, everybody join in and do all 3 movements at the same time.
It doesn't matter what you are wearing.

Lyrics:
Chorus: What are you wearing, what are you wearing?
What are you wearing today, today?
What are you wearing, what are you wearing?
What are you wearing today, today?

If you're wearing shoes, shake your shoes
If you're wearing pants, pat your pants
If you're wearing a shirt, shrug your shoulders
Now shake, pat, shrug, do all three
When everybody's movin', it's a treat to see

Repeat Chorus

If you're wearing a sweater or a sweatshirt, swing your arms
If you're wearing buttons or a blouse, bounce up and down
If you're wearing socks, step softly
Now swing, bounce, step, do all three
When everybody's movin', it's a treat to see

If you're wearing jeans, jump with joy
If it's tights or a dress, turn with the drum
If you're wearing any other clothes, clap your hands
Now jump, turn, clap, do all three
When everybody's movin', it's a treat to see

Repeat Chorus

Variation:
For younger children, start with just the first verse and chorus. Add
verses as children become familiar with the song and activity.

Follow up:
List clothing not named in this song. Can you think of ways to move that begin
with the same sound?
Examples:

Skirt - skip, skate
Vest - vibrate
Jacket - jiggle, jump
Look at the different colors you are wearing. Stand when your color is called:
If you're wearing red, rub your ribs
If you're wearing blue, bounce like a ball
If you're wearing green or gray, giggle and grin
If you're wearing yellow, yodel and yawn
If you're wearing purple or pink, prance like a pony
If you're wearing orange, lead an orchestra

*Original version from Learning Basic Skills Through Music, available from
Educational Activities, 1-800-645-3739.

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17. The English Language Gets A Little Kooky - Vowels
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Different ways to spell long vowel sounds
Changes in mood and tempo of music

Teacher Note: Each verse features a different long vowel sound. Bold letters within the
example words show how the featured sound is spelled. Place each example word on the
board or word chart. For example, in the first verse, display the following words:
baby lady snake cake rain eight clay
play say crazy chain ways make

Activity:
Look at the words on the board. Call out each word I touch with the pointer.
When the music suddenly speeds up, jump up and create a kooky dance.
When the music slows down, sit back down and get ready to read more words.

Lyrics:
'A' makes the /ay/ sound in baby and lady
But 'A' with a silent 'E' says the /ay/ in snake and cake
'A-I' says /ay/ in rain, 'E-I' says /ay/ in number eight
'A' and 'Y' together say /ay/ in clay, and play, Say,
Why this crazy chain of ways to make the sound of /ay/ ?

Chorus:
Oh, the English language gets a little kooky
Gets a little kooky now and then
The English language gets a little kooky
Now and then, my friend.

Two 'E's' say /ee/ in knee and tree
But E-A' says /ee/ in peach and teach
'I-E' says /ee/ in chief, one 'E' says /ee/ in she and he
And if that's not enough, here's another way
'Y' makes the /ee/ sound in silly, goofy, hee, hee, hee, hee, hee!

Repeat Chorus

'I' makes the /igh/ sound in ivy and China
But 'I' with a silent 'E' says /igh/ in rice and mice
'I-E' says /igh/ in pie 'Y-E 'says /igh/ in good-bye
'I-G-H' says /igh/ in sigh, and 'Y' says /igh/ in cry

Repeat Chorus

Two 'O's make the /oo/ sound in spoon and moon
But 'U-E' says /oo/ in blue and glue
'E-W' says /oo/ in chew; one 'O' says /oo/ in who
And 'U' with a silent 'E' says /oo/ in June and tune
And 'O-U-G H' says /oo/ in through, What??
'O-U-G H' says /oo/ in through . . .
I hope we're through with /oo/!

Repeat Chorus

'O-A' says /o/ in boat and float
But 'O' with a silent 'E' says /o/ in rose and nose
'O-E' says /o/ in toes, one /o/ says /o/ in go
'O-W' says /o/ in grow
This only goes to show
What now I know you know

Repeat Chorus

Ho, ho, ho, ha, ha, ha, la, la, la, la, la, la, la

Follow-up:
In this song we start with a sound and see how different letters
are used to symbolize the same sound. We can also reverse this and start with letters
and see the different sounds the same letter can symbolize.
Here are some short verses to illustrate:

'A' makes the /aah/ sound in mat and cat
'A' with a silent 'E' says /ay/ in bake and shake
'A' makes the /aw/ sound in pasta and father
The funny thing is you see is A can be all three!

Two O's make the /oo/ sound in pool and cool
Two O's make the /uh/ sound in book and look
Two O's and 'R' go /or/ in door and floor
The funny thing you see - two O's can be all three!

'Y'' goes /yuh/ in yo yo and yak
'Y ' goes /igh/ at the end of cry and shy
'Y' goes /ee/ in batty, nutty, daffy,
/Yuh/, /igh/, /ee/, 'Y' can be all three!

Now take the word "because,"
A strange word if there ever was
A-U-S-E, why all those letters to say just 'uz'?...because...
The English language gets a little kooky!

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18. Good-Bye, So Long, Toodle-oo
Words and Music: Hap Palmer

Subjects:
Adding one more
Accumulative patterns
Sequential memory

Vocabulary:
Goodbye, farewell, so long, toodle-oo, see you later, alligator, got to boogie, oh yeah.

Activity:
This is a call-and-response chant. Listen to each line, wait 2 beats then
repeat what you heard. The first line has just one word, "goodbye," Each new
line repeats what you heard then adds one more word. So, we have an "add one
more" or accumulative pattern where the phrase gets longer and longer until we have
a string of 4 ways to say goodbye. Next, we combine the words with a simple melody
and sing. The second verse presents 4 more ways to say goodbye. The ultimate
challenge is to recall and sing 8 ways of saying goodbye.

Lyric:
Goodbye Goodbye
Goodbye, so long Goodbye, so long
Goodbye, so long, farewell Goodbye, so long, farewell
Goodbye, so long, farewell, toodle-oo Goodbye, so long, farewell, toodle-oo

(Sing) Goodbye, so long, farewell, toodle-oo
Goodbye, so long, farewell, toodle-oo
If you want any more, here's another four

See you later See you later
See you later, alligator See you later, alligator
See you later, alligator, got to boogie See you later alligator, got to boogie
See you later alligator, got to boogie, oh yeah
See you later alligator, got to boogie, oh yeah

(sing:) Goodbye, so long, farewell, toodle-loo
See you later, alligator, got to boogie, oh yeah
Goodbye, so long, farewell, toodle-loo
See you later, alligator, got to boogie, oh yeah

Variation:
Add motions to go with each word.
For example:

Goodbye Wave right hand
So long Wave left hand
Farewell Wave both hands
Toodle-loo Wiggle fingers
See you later Shade eyes with hand above brow
Alligator Place arms together and clap hands like jaw of alligator
Got to boogie Twist arms and shoulders one way
as you twist hips in the opposite direction
Oh yeah Snap fingers 2 times

Follow-up:
Here are some ways to use the instrumental version (# ) of this song:

1. Think of other ways to say goodbye. Examples: After awhile crocodile, bye bye
butterfly, no more lip potato chip, see ya soon baboon.

2. Say goodbye in different languages. For example, here are 8 ways to say
goodbye in Spanish: adios, hasta manana, ciao, hasta luego, cuidate, hasta
pronto, hasta la vista, bye-bye,

3. Chant counting patterns. For example:
2, 4 2, 4
2, 4, 6, 8 2, 4, 6, 8
2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12
2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16

4. Working in pairs, partners can take turns creating an accumulative movement

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Credits:
Recording Engineer: Joe Bellamy
Arranger: Miriam Mayer
Guitars: Paul Viapiano, Tim May, Hap Palmer
Mandolin, Banjo: Tim May
Keyboards: Steve Kaplan, Dave Witham, Joe Bellamy
Drums: Tom Walsh
Bass: Jim Garafalo
Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Saxophone: Richard Mitchell
Violins: Cameron Patrick, Kathleen Robertson, Miriam Mayer
Cello: Melissa Hasin
Trumpet: Chris Tedesco
Tenor Sax, Bassoon: Bob Carr
Trombone: Jim McMillan
Tuba: Ken Kegler
French Horn: Stephanie Mijanovich
Background Vocals: Steve Lively, Karen Harper, Scottie Haskell, Carmen Carter, Shelby Daniel, Angie Jarée, Hap Palmer
Children's Chorus Director: Steve Lively
Children's Chorus: Laura Lively, Marcella Lively, Micah Lively, Cameron Covell, Jesse Mills, Kate Pearce, Annie Garafalo, Brenna Mills, Garrett Rankin
Children's Chorus II Director: Miriam Mayer
Children's Chorus: Adam Abdul-Hamid, Ramsey Abdul-Hamid, Annie Garafalo, Austin Kilgore, Caitlin Kilgore, Rebeccah Leff, Laura Lively, Danny McClintick, Claralyse Palmer, Megan Schulze.
Teaching Guide Editors: Darlene Anderson, Angelia Leung
Designed and Illustrated by: Carole Schumacher Onaitis
Guide Book Layout: Stan Onaitis

All songs published by Hap-Pal Music. ©Hap-Pal Music all rights reserved. No part of these lyrics or activities may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without permission from the publisher.

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